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I have a class (Queue) which inherits from a class named Stack. it goes like this:

template <class T> class Stack
{
         public:
                virtual const T pop();
                 LinkedList<T> lst;
};

template <class T> class Queue : public Stack<T>
{
         public:
                virtual const T pop();
};

template <class T> const T Queue<T>::pop()
{
                             const T val = lst[0];
                             return val;
}

The compiler says "lst undecleared"...why?

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1  
Also, unless you do this as an exercise (or perhaps homework), you are strongly advised to use std::stack and std::queue from the standard library. If you don't like those standard classes because of the separate top and pop member functions, I suggest you read about exception safety (providing a pop function alone is never enough). –  Alexandre C. Oct 26 '11 at 20:29
    
How a queue is-a stack? Reconsider the inheritance relationship, it probably does not make that much sense for your use case. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 26 '11 at 21:39

2 Answers 2

Because lst is a member of the base class Stack<T> which is a dependent type on T. The compiler can't check dependent types until the template is fully instantiated. You have to let the compiler know that lst is part of such base class by writing Stack<T>::lst.

As its mention in comments, this->lst is also a viable solution. However, people are likely to remove the this as seen unnecessary. Stack<T>::lst seems more explicit in this way.

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So that means, that for every data member which is dependent on T, I'm supposed to write Stack<T>::name ? –  Taru Oct 26 '11 at 20:27
1  
K-ballo: Or this->lst. @TaruStolovich: Or this->name. Or Queue<T>::name –  Robᵩ Oct 26 '11 at 20:28
    
I've most often seen the this->lst solution and not the solution that uses the scope operator. –  Michael Price Oct 26 '11 at 21:11
    
this->lst is also a viable solution, but people are most likely to remove it as unnecessary opposed to base::lst. –  K-ballo Oct 26 '11 at 21:12

Try this->lst instead of lst.

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