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I am used to having one main branch (master) and working in topic branches. But I'm working on a project now with two main branches (master and experimental) and I am unsure how to best merge my topic branch into both?

Is this the right way to do it? If not can someone let me know the right way.

(master)$ git checkout -b bugfix
# do bug fix here
(bugfix)$ git commit -a -m 'Fixed bug.'
(bugfix)$ git checkout master
(master)$ git merge bugfix

(master)$ git checkout bugfix
(bugfix)$ git rebase experimental
(bugfix)$ git checkout experimental
(experimental)$ git merge bugfix

Thank you.

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1 Answer

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Don't do the rebase and you're set. Simply merge your bugfix branch into each branch you need it

(master)$ git checkout -b bugfix
# do bug fix here
(bugfix)$ git commit -a -m 'Fixed bug.'
(bugfix)$ git checkout master
(master)$ git merge bugfix

(bugfix)$ git checkout experimental
(experimental)$ git merge bugfix

When doing the rebase you are creating a commit similar to the already merged commit, but different. Doing the rebase followed by checkout+merge is essentially equivalent to cherry-picking the bug fixing commit.

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Thank you. Doing it this way, will only the merge commit show in master and experimental? Can I do it so my topic branch commits show? What is the usual thing to do here with Git? –  user1015384 Oct 26 '11 at 20:47
    
After merging bugfix both master and experimental will contain all commits which are reachable from bugfix (do git log bugfix to show them). –  knittl Oct 26 '11 at 20:49
    
ok thank you and finally when there is only 1 commit in the topic branch, can i avoid the separate merge commit appearing in master and experimental? –  user1015384 Oct 26 '11 at 20:52
    
No, not if you merge it. Alternatively, you could fix the bug in master (or in a topic branch and then merge to master) and merge master into experimental, but this will still give you two merge commits. –  knittl Oct 26 '11 at 20:55
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