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I have a parent interface and a child interface which objects will implement. I've made a child interface because I want a specific VehicleEntity object say Truck to add itself to the HashMap in Car. A Truck will call VehicleManager's addToCar() method which add the Truck object into Car's hashMap. The issue I have is CarEntity ce = ve;. Netbeans is telling me to cast ve to CarEntity but I don't want to. Shouldn't the line of code be valid (assuming the the object the for loop is looking at is a Car object)? How can I fix this?

public interface VehicleEntity {
    getId();
    getSpeed();
    move();
    }

public interface CarEntity extends VehicleEntity{
    addToCar(String c);
}

public class Car implements CarEntity{
HashMap<String, VehicleEntity> cars = new HashMap<String, VehicleEntity>();

    public void addToCar(String c) {
       cars.add(c);
    }
}

public class VehicleManager {
    HashMap<String, VehicleEntity> vehicles = new HashMap<String, VehicleEntity>();

public void reportToCar(String id) {
    for (VehicleEntity ve : ve.values()) {
        if (ve.getId().equals(id)) {
            CarEntity ce = ve; // Issue here
        }
    }
}
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What class does that reportToCar method belong to? –  G_H Oct 26 '11 at 21:25
    
class VehicleManager –  Dan Oct 26 '11 at 21:30
    
There's more problems here... In addToCar you call add on a HashMap. There's no such method. You'll need to use put(String c, Something s). What's that Something? –  G_H Oct 26 '11 at 21:31
    
Yea, at first I had ArrayList, I forgot to change it –  Dan Oct 26 '11 at 21:45
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Really, that's not at all valid. You can move from the specific to the general without casting, but not back again. For instance, you can store an ArrayList in a List variable, but you can't take a List and put it into an ArrayList variable without casting. In the same way, you can't take a vehicle and say it is a car without explicitly casting.

So, in this case, since you know the vehicle is a car, cast to a car explicitly.

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I see. That's what I thought at first, just needed some confirmation. Thanks! –  Dan Oct 26 '11 at 21:46
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I'm not entirely certain what it is you're trying to reach here, so I'm gonna list some corrected classes with my best guesses first...

public interface VehicleEntity {

    public String getId();

    public String getSpeed();

    public void move();

}

public interface CarEntity extends VehicleEntity {

    public void addToCar(String key, CarEntity c);

}

import java.util.HashMap;

public class Car implements CarEntity{ 
HashMap<String, VehicleEntity> cars = new HashMap<String, VehicleEntity>();

    @Override
    public void addToCar(String key, CarEntity car) {
       cars.put(key, this);
    }

    @Override
    public String getId() {
        throw new UnsupportedOperationException("Not supported yet.");
    }

    @Override
    public String getSpeed() {
        throw new UnsupportedOperationException("Not supported yet.");
    }

    @Override
    public void move() {
        throw new UnsupportedOperationException("Not supported yet.");
    }
}

... then show you a cool trick using generics:

import java.util.HashMap;

public class VehicleManager {

    HashMap<String, VehicleEntity> vehicles =
        new HashMap<String, VehicleEntity>();

    public <T extends VehicleEntity> T report(String id) {
        for(VehicleEntity ve : vehicles.values()) {
            if(ve.getId().equals(id)) {
                @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
                T ce = (T)ve;
                return ce;
            }
        }
        return null;
    }

    public void test() {

        final Car c = report("test");

    }

}

I've parameterized the method report with a T extending VehicleEntity. It will return something of that type T. When using this in method test(), we've stated that we want a Car. Now some type inference is gonna go on, automatically calling method report for the type Car. If the VehicleEntity in the map with the given id isn't a Car, we'll get a ClassCastException since we're trying to cast to Car when calling thet method in that context.

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My problem was concerning casting. I do not want to cast but as @Micah stated it can't be done. –  Dan Oct 26 '11 at 22:06
    
@Dan Sometimes you just have to cast. But I'm not certain what exactly your design is trying to achieve, so maybe a different approach would yield a different result. Without casts. Just not in your current structure. If you could have a separate VehicleManager for each type it could be avoided (with generics), but since that isn't the case, my suggestion could avoid having a separate method for each subtype of VehicleEntity you make. Something to keep in mind. –  G_H Oct 26 '11 at 22:07
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