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I am using PHP to process a form and handle errors. The errors work fine, but the issue is that I am wanting to add it to the page with my form on (if an error is found) without refreshing the page. This is because the user can add rows dynamically to my form, and I don't want these extra rows to be lost (which happens when the page is refreshed).

At the moment then, I simply have the following line on my form (PHP) page:

<?=$errorString?>

And then I define $errorString in booking-engine.php, and add include 'workshops.php'; which refreshes the page to add the error.

Is it possible to add the error without refreshing the page, and if so, how would I go about this?

Thanks,

Nick

FULL PHP SCRIPT:

$row_count = count($_POST['name']);
if ($row_count > 0) {

mysql_select_db($database, $connection);
$name = array();
$workshop = array(); 
$not_found = array();

for($i = 0; $i < $row_count; $i++) {
// variable sanitation...
$name[$i] = mysql_real_escape_string(ucwords($_POST['name'][$i]));
$workshop[$i] = mysql_real_escape_string($_POST['workshop'][$i]);
}
$names = "('".implode("','",$name)."')";

$not_in = Array();

// lets say all names doesn't exist in `conference`
foreach($name as $value) {
    // names in array are keys, not values
    $not_in[$value] = true;
}


$query = mysql_query("SELECT Name FROM conference WHERE Name IN $names"); 
while(list($dbname) = @mysql_fetch_row($query)) {
    // delete those name from $not_in who exists
    unset($not_in[$dbname]);
}

// names in $not_in array are keys, not values
$not_in = array_keys($not_in);

if(empty($not_in)) {
    // its ok, all names have been found. do the magic.
    for($i = 0; $i < $row_count; $i++) {
    $sql = "UPDATE conference SET Workshop = '$workshop[$i]' WHERE Name LIKE '$name[$i]'";
    mysql_query($sql);
    $body .= "Name: " . $name[$i] . "    Workshop: " . $workshop[$i] . "\n\n";
          }

    // send email 
    $success = mail($emailTo, $subject, $body, "From: <$emailFrom>");

    // redirect to success page 
    if ($success){
      print "<meta http-equiv=\"refresh\" content=\"0;URL=thanks-workshop.html\">";
    }
    else{
      print "<meta http-equiv=\"refresh\" content=\"0;URL=error.htm\">";
    }

}else{
    $errorString = "<div id=\"error\">".'<strong>The following name(s) have not been found on our database of bookings</strong>:<div id=\"names\">'.join(', ',$not_in)."</div><div id=\"error-sub\">Please check the name(s) and try submitting your booking again.  Each name needs to be identical to the name you first booked on to the conference, as described above.</div></div>";
    include 'workshops.php';
}
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

PHP is server-side and what you want to do is on the client. So you'll need to use (client-side) Javascript to submit the data to your server-side PHP validation and then update the page with the results. See AJAX for background and jQuery.post() for some practical examples.

share|improve this answer
    
Doh! Just when I thought I was getting close... Forgive me for being slow, I am fairly new to the whole PHP, Javascript, Ajax world. I have now included the PHP that validates the form against the data already in a MySQL table at the end of my question above. Are you saying that, using Ajax I can keep the validation in my PHP file as it stands? Thanks. –  Nick Oct 26 '11 at 23:55
    
Not exactly. Normally, a browser talks to PHP by loading a new page (a GET or POST). When you post your form, your browser submits all of the data and loads the new page. Using AJAX, you use Javascript to make that request instead. So, instead of your PHP talking directly to the user, your PHP talks to the Javascript. Then the Javascript talks to the user. –  John Watson Oct 27 '11 at 4:51
    
Thanks for the info John. Nick –  Nick Oct 28 '11 at 17:04

You can use javascript to validate your form on the client side, either directly in the browser or using ajax to check on the server-side.

However, you will need to change your server-side processing script to automatically add the extra rows that the visitor has added as javascript can be disabled.

I assume you are going to process the extra rows anyway, so you might as well add them back to the form when you're building it...

share|improve this answer
    
Doh! Just when I thought I was getting close... Forgive me for being slow, I am fairly new to the whole PHP, Javascript, Ajax world. I have now included the PHP that validates the form against the data already in a MySQL table at the end of my question above. Are you saying that, using Ajax I can keep the validation in my PHP file as it stands? Also, are you saying that I will need to re-add the extra rows using my PHP script? If so, will they retain the data that has been entered into them? Thanks. –  Nick Oct 26 '11 at 22:33

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