Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

So I'm trying to match something like

2011,2012,2013

or

2011,

or

2011 

but NOT:

2011,201 or 2011,201,2012

I tried with ([0-9]{4},?([0-9]{4},?)*) but if the first year is matched, it does not consider the rest .

share|improve this question
    
Regular expressions... – user166390 Oct 26 '11 at 21:58
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You were close.

 ^[0-9]{4}(?:,[0-9]{4})*,?$

That will match any string consisting of a repeating sequence of 4-digit numbers and commas.

The ^ and $ match the beginning and end of the string, respectively. Thus, it will only match if the string consists of only those elements.

The (?:) is a non-capture group. It allows you to create repeating groups without storing all of them into variables.

EDIT: Forgot about the optional comma at the end. Added a ,? to take care of it.

EDIT 2: At FailedDev's advice, here was my original idea. It also works, but I think it is harder to understand. It is more clever, but that's not always a good thing.

^(:?[0-9]{4}(?:,|$))+$
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 For speed and brevity :) – FailedDev Oct 26 '11 at 21:42
    
Why did you change it? Original was working fine! – FailedDev Oct 26 '11 at 21:47
    
The 2011, case is not covered (yes... I agree it's ugly, but it's there). Also there is an unbalanced parenthesis at the end. – 6502 Oct 26 '11 at 21:48
    
You mean my very first one? It was so ugly! – Chriszuma Oct 26 '11 at 21:48
1  
nice, thank you for your help. Much appreciated. This will do just fine – mircea . Oct 26 '11 at 21:50
if (subject.match(/^\d{4}(?:,?|(?:,\d{4}))+$/)) {
    // Successful match
}

This should work.

Explanation :

"^" +              // Assert position at the beginning of the string
"\\d" +             // Match a single digit 0..9
   "{4}" +            // Exactly 4 times
"(?:" +            // Match the regular expression below
   "|" +              // Match either the regular expression below (attempting the next alternative only if this one fails)
      "," +              // Match the character “,” literally
         "?" +              // Between zero and one times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy)
   "|" +              // Or match regular expression number 2 below (the entire group fails if this one fails to match)
      "(?:" +            // Match the regular expression below
         "," +              // Match the character “,” literally
         "\\d" +             // Match a single digit 0..9
            "{4}" +            // Exactly 4 times
      ")" +
")+" +             // Between one and unlimited times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy)
"$"                // Assert position at the end of the string (or before the line break at the end of the string, if any)
share|improve this answer
    
I think this also works for the intended purpose. Thank you – mircea . Oct 26 '11 at 21:56
    
Also, nice explanation, cheers! +1 – mircea . Oct 26 '11 at 22:04

This will do the trick...

 /^[0-9]{4}(,[0-9]{4})*,?$/

i.e. 4 digits followed by zero or more of (a comma followed by 4 digits) and optionally a last (bad looking) comma before the end.

The first ^ and last $ chars ensure that nothing else can be present in the string.

share|improve this answer
    
This is wrong. It will not match : 2011, as the OP wants. – FailedDev Oct 26 '11 at 21:39
    
@FailedDev: whoops... you're right (even if accepting 2011, to me looks strange... why not ,2011 or ,,,2011,, then ?) – 6502 Oct 26 '11 at 21:41
    
Well I don't know. Ask the OP :) – FailedDev Oct 26 '11 at 21:43
    
the previous regex you posted kind of worked. I was gonna trim the trailing comma's if it were the case. Thank you. – mircea . Oct 26 '11 at 21:52
/^(?:\d{4},?)*$/

Checks for four digits, each possibly followed by a comma, 0 to many times

share|improve this answer
    
change the * to a + if you want to make sure there is at least one year in the string. – Marshall Oct 26 '11 at 21:39
    
This will match 3049858499028439753955028. – Chriszuma Oct 26 '11 at 21:39
    
no it won't. Tested in Node. /^(?:\d{4},?)*$/.test('3049858499028439753955028'); // false – Marshall Oct 26 '11 at 21:40
    
the {4} after the \d will not allow 5+ digits. It wants exactly four. – Marshall Oct 26 '11 at 21:41
    
My bad, I didn't actually count the numbers, as my point was that the comma being optional is wrong. Any string of a multiple of 4 numbers will match. Try it with 304985849902843975395502. – Chriszuma Oct 26 '11 at 21:42

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.