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There is a two dimensional array of Blocks in the class Map. I need a method to change the variable value in the class Block.

class Block
{
    Block(BlockValue blockValue = BLANK);

    //first solution
    void Block::setValue(BlockValue blockValue, Map &map);

    void setImage(BlockValue blockValue, int n = 0);

    //the value to be changed
    BlockValue value;

    static std::vector< std::vector<sf::Image> > images;

    ...
};

 class Map
 {
     std::vector< std::vector<Block> > blocks;

     //second solution
     void setBlockValue(BlockValue blockValue, int i, int j);

     ...
 };

I can think of two solutions:

  1. I create a Block::setValue(BlockValue blockValue, Map &map) in the class Block and call it from the Map in the following way:

    blocks[i][j].setValue(blockValue, this);

  2. I create a setBlockValue(BlockValue blockValue, int i, int j) method int the class Map. The problem with this solution is that I can't use my constructor for Block:

    Block::Block(BlockValue blockValue) { setValue(blockValue); }

Which solution would you recommend?

EDIT: I forgot to mention that it is important that the method have access to the array of Blocks. That's why I included the Map &map in the parameter list of the first method. I apologize for this terrible mistake.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your question is not very clear, from a clarity point of view, I'd combine both. e.g.

class Block
{
  public:
    // setter to set the block value
    void setValue(BlockValue blockValue);

  private:
    //the value to be changed
    BlockValue value;
};

and in Map have a method to set the BlockValue for a specific location

class Map
{
  public
    void setBlockValue(BlockValue blockValue, int i, int j)
    {
      blocks[i][j].setValue(blockValue); // call the specific setter
    }

  private:
    std::vector< std::vector<Block> > blocks;
};
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Your solution seems appropriate, only the Block::setValue(BlockValue blockValue) method doesn't have acces to the array of Blocks. Sorry but I haven't told you about this in the original post. I have already edited it. –  ThePetest Oct 26 '11 at 22:51
    
You are introducing a circular dependency this way - why not simply pass the blocks array to the specific block in the setValue call? –  Nim Oct 27 '11 at 8:04
    
You're right, it's so obvious. Thank you! –  ThePetest Oct 27 '11 at 10:40

You can reduce the number of lines of code and also improve efficiency with:

class Map
 {
     std::vector< std::vector<Block> > blocks;
     ...

     Block& block(int i, int j) {
         return blocks[i*num_cols + j];
     }
 };

Returning a reference will allow the caller to use assignment

mymap.block(i, j) = ...;

and will save you from having to provide separate calls for reading and writing.

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Your code is very interesting but I can't use it. The original post didn't cover my problem fully, I have already edited it. I am sorry for this mistake. I would be happy to use the modified version of your code if it solves my problem. –  ThePetest Oct 26 '11 at 22:58

I think first solution more flexible. If Block will past it self to map, your can do what you want on pre insert to map, or on post insert moments.

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