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if i have a function like that:

function ($form, $db) {  
     $v = count($a);
}

function ($form, $db);

and this code in the same file

<script type="text/javascript">
$(document).ready(function() {
    for ($i=0; $i< <?php echo $v-1; ?>; $i++) {//here
}

how can i access the variable $v ? i already know that global variables are generally a bad practice, so what is the alternative?

thanks

share|improve this question
    
... when/where does PHP run? when/where does JavaScript run? Does sorting that out lead to any insights? – user166390 Oct 26 '11 at 22:10
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use return $v:

function ($form, $db) {  
     $v = count($a);
     return $v;
}

<script type="text/javascript">
$(document).ready(function() {
    for ($i=0; $i< <?php echo function( $form , $db )-1; ?>; $i++) {//here
}
share|improve this answer
    
no need for $v = as return count( will suffice – Ben Swinburne Oct 26 '11 at 22:14
    
if i want to access two variables, suppose, $v and $otherV, this approach doesn't work right? one return per function, i guess – Daniel Oct 26 '11 at 22:16
    
You are totally right! – Michael Sazonov Oct 26 '11 at 22:16
1  
@Daniel You could alternatively define the variable empty in the global scope (outside the function) and pass it as reference &$var into the function. Then whatever happens to it within the function will also be reflected on the outside. EDIT: This way you can do more than just the one variable per function. – imkingdavid Oct 26 '11 at 22:20

Use return on your function to set the value of $v in the global scope. Then the variable will be accessible outside of the function.

<?php
function ttt($form, $db)
{
    return count($db);
}
$v = ttt($form, $db);

Now $v is accessible via the global scope.

Also, note that javascript variables do not use the $ prefix, so $i would need to be just i... unless I'm missing something there.

share|improve this answer

Use a global variable; just give it a more descriptive name than $v so there's no danger of it clashing with something else.

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What about basic return ?

function name($form, $db) {  
     $v = count($a);
     return $v;
}

$v = name($form, $db);
share|improve this answer

use the function itself, give it a name and use the returned value liks this

function counter($form, $db) {  
 $v = count($a);
 return $v;
}

and on the script file call the function this way

<script type="text/javascript">
$(document).ready(function() {
  for ($i=0; $i< <?php echo ($this->counter())-1; ?>; $i++) {//here
}

i hope it helps

share|improve this answer

Use a class to declare your global variables, so it can give them a context

Example :

class Config {
    public static $v;
}

then you can use Config::$v = count(a);

This can be useful if you have more global variables like some configuration parameters that are related to each other and you need to read and write them throughout the application.

If it's not a case and this is just a singular case, than you should consider using the return value.

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