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Supposed I have a class MyThread, which implements Runnable with a method dosomething():

class MyThread implements Runnable{
    Object dosomething(Parameter p){ ... }    
    run(){...};
}

If I do:

main(){
    MyThread my = new MyThread().run();    
    Object o = my.dosomething(p);
}

will dosomething be executed on myThread or in the main Thread?
How can I start the execution of dosomething on myThread from the main Thread and retrieve the returned Object?

share|improve this question
    
Why would you want to do that? It won't parallelize. –  SLaks Oct 26 '11 at 22:12
    
@Skip, please use proper naming conventions: class names start with a capital letter (e.g. MyThread instead of myThread). –  Lirik Oct 26 '11 at 22:15

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted
main(){
    MyThread my = new MyThread().run();    
    Object o = my.dosomething(p);
}
  • If you do that it won't compile: you're trying to assign the result of a void method, void run(), to an object of type MyThread.
  • Implementing runnable and calling run() will not cause the code to be executed in a separate thread unless you pass it to another thread (i.e. Tread t = new Thread(my);)

How can I start the execution of dosomething on myThread from the main Thread and retrieve the returned Object?

You do that by storing the result of doSomething() in a location where you can access it later.

class MyClass
{
    public Object doSomething()
    {
        // return the object
        return new Object();
    }
}

class MyRunnable implements Runnable
{
    private final MyClass _mc;
    private final object _lock;
    private final List<object> _results;

    public MyRunnable(MyClass mc, List<object> results, object lock)
    {
        _mc = mc;
        _lock = lock;
        _results = results;
    }

    public void run()
    {
        synchronized(_lock)
        {
            _results.add(_mc.doSomething());
        }
    }
}

So now in main:

void main(){

    MyClass mc = new MyClass();
    List<object> results = new List<object>();
    object lock = new object();

    // Execute your thread and wait for it to complete
    Thread t = new Thread(new MyRunnable(mc, results, lock ));
    t.start();
    t.join();

    // Get the results
    for(object result:results)
    {
        // do something with the result
    }
}

This should give you an idea of what you're doing "wrong." A more realistic example would be if you spawn multiple threads, run them concurrently and then join on all of them until they all complete.

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That is not possible.

When you create a thread, it runs the code in run() and exits.
There is no way to inject code into a different thread; that would break the core execution model. (Within a thread, your code runs sequentially, with nothing in between)

If you want to, you can create a thread that listens for callback (Runnable instances) in a queue and executes them (like a message loop).
This is how the UI thread works.


Also, you aren't actually startign a thread; you need to write new Thread(someRunnable).start()

share|improve this answer
    
Are you sure you're getting his question entirely right? –  G_H Oct 26 '11 at 22:17
    
@G_H: Yes. He's asking to run his method on a separate already-started thread. –  SLaks Oct 26 '11 at 22:52
    
I think he just wants to start a thread to execute the method asynchronously, but control when exactly the method's gonna be called within that thread from his main thread. Then retrieve the method's result when it has returned. Like others pointed out, there's plenty of stuff available to do just that. It's not impossible at all. Just because the poster's wording might be slightly confusing or he/she's not familiar with Java threading doesn't mean we shouldn't read between the lines. –  G_H Oct 26 '11 at 22:58
    
@G_H: No; he wants to run it on myThread, which he thinks is an already-started thread. –  SLaks Oct 26 '11 at 23:00
    
Okay, so he's mistaken about the run() method as well. Should've used start(). All the more reason to correct him, right? –  G_H Oct 26 '11 at 23:02

It'll be executed on the main thread, since it's that thread that calls the method. If you want dosomething to run in the separate thread, have it called within run() and store the result in a myThread field for later retrieval.

You might want to check class Future or other stuff in java.util.concurrent for some convenient way of waiting for the result to become available.

EDIT: if dosomething should only run until some condition is satisfied that must be flagged in the main thread, have run() block until the main thread somehow signals the other thread that it's okay to go on.

EDIT 2: here, someone confirm this is what's being asked:

package threadtest;

public class Main {

    public static void main(final String[] args) {

        final MyThread otherThread = new MyThread();

        System.out.println("Main thread: I'm gonna start the other thread now...");
        otherThread.start();

        System.out.println("Main thread: there, hope it does well.");

        try {
            Thread.sleep(1000); //Lets main thread take a snooze...
        } catch(InterruptedException ex) {
            //whatever
        }

        System.out.println("Main thread: I'm gonna do some stuff in the meantime...");

        try {
            Thread.sleep(200); //Lets main thread take a snooze...
        } catch(InterruptedException ex) {
            //whatever
        }

        System.out.println("Main thread: maybe clean up the kitchen.");

        try {
            Thread.sleep(1000); //Lets main thread take a snooze...
        } catch(InterruptedException ex) {
            //whatever
        }

        System.out.println("Main thread: does other thread have something for me yet?");

        if(otherThread.getResult() == null)
            System.out.println("Main thread: nope, not yet.");

        try {
            Thread.sleep(500); //Lets main thread take a snooze...
        } catch(InterruptedException ex) {
            //whatever
        }

        System.out.println("Main thread: oh crap! I forgot to tell it that it may execute its method!");

        otherThread.allowToExecute();

        System.out.println("Main thread: phew... better keep checking now before it gets angry.");

        while(otherThread.getResult() == null) {
            try {
                Thread.sleep(100); //Lets main thread take a snooze...
            } catch(InterruptedException ex) {
                //whatever
            }
        }

        System.out.println("Main thread: there we go, it gave me a result. Rest in peace, other thread...");

    }

    private static class MyThread extends Thread {

        private boolean mayExecuteDoSomething = false;
        private Object result = null;

        @Override
        public void run() {

            System.out.println("Other thread: whoa, someone started me!");

            while(!mayExecuteDoSomething) {
                try {
                    Thread.sleep(100); //I'm gonna sleep for a bit...
                } catch(InterruptedException ex) {
                    //whatever
                }
            }

            System.out.println("Other thread: alright, I'm allowed to execute my method!");

            result = doSomething();

            System.out.println("Other thread: there, did it. I'll just call it quits now.");

        }

        public void allowToExecute() {

            mayExecuteDoSomething = true;

        }

        private Object doSomething() {

            return new Object();

        }

        public Object getResult() {

            return result;

        }

    }

}

This is a very crude approach to the issue. The basic concepts are there, though. In reality, you'd want to use stuff like Callable and Future for proper asynchronous computation.

share|improve this answer

Sounds like you may want to consider Callables and Futures. There's a decent explanation at http://www.vogella.de/articles/JavaConcurrency/article.html#futures

share|improve this answer
    
Thnx, yes with Callables it is much easier to work with Threads which return values. –  Skip Oct 27 '11 at 11:09

You can use delegate, for example.

new MyThread(callWhenFinishObject)
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