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Do you know any tool which can count all the code lines from a PHP project?

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closed as off-topic by David Eisenstat, Bill the Lizard Sep 2 '14 at 19:36

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7 Answers 7

up vote 57 down vote accepted

On a POSIX operating system (e.g. Linux or OS X) you can write the following into your Bash shell:

wc -l `find . -iname "*.php"`

This will count the lines in all php-files in the current directory and also subdirectories. (Note that those single 'quotes' are backticks, not actual single quotes)

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2  
And if you are on Windows, you can download and install Cygwin, and do likewise. Since Mac runs on top of a BSD OS now as well, I consider this the definitive answer. –  George Jempty Apr 26 '09 at 14:47
    
Keep in mind if you've got a lot of PHP template files and/or other PHP files with mixed PHP/HTML code, this isn't going to exclude HTML only lines. –  Alan Storm Apr 26 '09 at 15:17
    
There is a limit to the command length in the shell; large codebases will exceed this. –  eukras Oct 18 '12 at 7:53
    
Unfortunately this doesn't work for Drupal and other projects that use different extensions for PHP code such as .module, .inc, and more –  Kasper Souren Jun 14 '13 at 8:43

I made myself a small script to do that in one of my projects. Simply use the following code on a php page in the root of your project. The script will do recursive check on sub folders.

<?php
/**
 * A very simple stats counter for all kind of stats about a development folder
 * 
 * @author Joel Lord
 * @copyright Engrenage (www.engrenage.biz)
 * 
 * For more information: joel@engrenage.biz

 */


$fileCounter = array();
$totalLines = countLines('.', $fileCounter); 
echo $totalLines." lines in the current folder<br>";
echo $totalLines - $fileCounter['gen']['commentedLines'] - $fileCounter['gen']['blankLines'] ." actual lines of code (not a comment or blank line)<br><br>";

foreach($fileCounter['gen'] as $key=>$val) {
    echo ucfirst($key).":".$val."<br>";
}

echo "<br>";

foreach($fileCounter as $key=>$val) {
    if(!is_array($val)) echo strtoupper($key).":".$val." file(s)<br>";
}




function countLines($dir, &$fileCounter) {
    $_allowedFileTypes = "(html|htm|phtml|php|js|css|ini)";
    $lineCounter = 0;
    $dirHandle = opendir($dir);
    $path = realpath($dir);
    $nextLineIsComment = false;

    if($dirHandle) {
        while(false !== ($file = readdir($dirHandle))) {
            if(is_dir($path."/".$file) && ($file !== '.' && $file !== '..')) {
                $lineCounter += countLines($path."/".$file, $fileCounter);
            } elseif($file !== '.' && $file !== '..') {
                //Check if we have a valid file 
                $ext = _findExtension($file);
                if(preg_match("/".$_allowedFileTypes."$/i", $ext)) {
                    $realFile = realpath($path)."/".$file;
                    $fileHandle = fopen($realFile, 'r');
                    $fileArray = file($realFile);
                    //Check content of file:
                    for($i=0; $i<count($fileArray); $i++) {
                        if($nextLineIsComment) {
                            $fileCounter['gen']['commentedLines']++;
                            //Look for the end of the comment block
                            if(strpos($fileArray[$i], '*/')) {
                                $nextLineIsComment = false;
                            }
                        } else {
                            //Look for a function
                            if(strpos($fileArray[$i], 'function')) {
                                $fileCounter['gen']['functions']++;
                            }
                            //Look for a commented line
                            if(strpos($fileArray[$i], '//')) {
                                $fileCounter['gen']['commentedLines']++;
                            }
                            //Look for a class
                            if(substr(trim($fileArray[$i]), 0, 5) == 'class') {
                                $fileCounter['gen']['classes']++;
                            }
                            //Look for a comment block
                            if(strpos($fileArray[$i], '/*')) {
                                $nextLineIsComment = true;
                                $fileCounter['gen']['commentedLines']++;
                                $fileCounter['gen']['commentBlocks']++;
                            }
                            //Look for a blank line
                            if(trim($fileArray[$i]) == '') {
                                $fileCounter['gen']['blankLines']++;
                            }
                        }

                    }
                    $lineCounter += count($fileArray);
                }
                //Add to the files counter
                $fileCounter['gen']['totalFiles']++;
                $fileCounter[strtolower($ext)]++;
            }
        }
    } else echo 'Could not enter folder';

    return $lineCounter;
}

function _findExtension($filename) {
    $filename = strtolower($filename) ; 
    $exts = split("[/\\.]", $filename) ; 
    $n = count($exts)-1; 
    $exts = $exts[$n]; 
    return $exts;  
}
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Wow, what a perfect code for any programmer. Does it calculates its own lines? –  quantme Nov 24 '12 at 15:37
    
Produces a lot of noise... Arrays and other values are uninitialized when used. –  Nux Sep 28 '14 at 0:13
    
I love it. Thank you. –  EngineerCoder Jan 10 at 14:48

SLOCCount is an awesome tool that produces a line-count report for a large number of languages. It also goes further by producing other, related statistics such as expected developer cost.

Here's an example:

$ sloccount .
Creating filelist for experimental
Creating filelist for prototype
Categorizing files.
Finding a working MD5 command....
Found a working MD5 command.
Computing results.


SLOC    Directory	SLOC-by-Language (Sorted)
10965   experimental    cpp=5116,ansic=4976,python=873
832     prototype       cpp=518,tcl=314


Totals grouped by language (dominant language first):
cpp:           5634 (47.76%)
ansic:         4976 (42.18%)
python:         873 (7.40%)
tcl:            314 (2.66%)




Total Physical Source Lines of Code (SLOC)                = 11,797
Development Effort Estimate, Person-Years (Person-Months) = 2.67 (32.03)
 (Basic COCOMO model, Person-Months = 2.4 * (KSLOC**1.05))
Schedule Estimate, Years (Months)                         = 0.78 (9.33)
 (Basic COCOMO model, Months = 2.5 * (person-months**0.38))
Estimated Average Number of Developers (Effort/Schedule)  = 3.43
Total Estimated Cost to Develop                           = $ 360,580
 (average salary = $56,286/year, overhead = 2.40).
SLOCCount, Copyright (C) 2001-2004 David A. Wheeler
SLOCCount is Open Source Software/Free Software, licensed under the GNU GPL.
SLOCCount comes with ABSOLUTELY NO WARRANTY, and you are welcome to
redistribute it under certain conditions as specified by the GNU GPL license;
see the documentation for details.
Please credit this data as "generated using David A. Wheeler's 'SLOCCount'."
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Unfortunately, SLOCCount is a bit long in the tooth and a pain in the neck for PHP projects, particularly ones that have a nested vendor directory you don't want counted. Also, it emits a warning for every PHP file that doesn't have a closing tag (which should be all of them if you aren't mixing HTML and PHP).

CLOC is a more modern alternative that does everything (edit: nearly everything) SLOCCount does, but also supports an --exclude-dir option and it doesn't suffer from the aforementioned close tag problem. It also emits a SQLite database that you can extract some pretty advanced metrics from.

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1  
Doesn't do everything SLOCCount does, still +1. –  Alix Axel May 31 '13 at 4:29
    
Interesting. What doesn't it do? –  Shabbyrobe May 31 '13 at 5:18
    
I was just looking for the time / cost / person estimates and I couldn't find any option in the man page that returns those. –  Alix Axel May 31 '13 at 5:26

The SLOCs of a PHP-project can counted with sloccount using something like this:

find . -not -wholename '*/libraries/*' -not -wholename '*/lib/*' -not -wholename '*/vendor/*' -type f xargs sloccount

Sample output for a sizey drupal project:

[...]
SLOC    Directory   SLOC-by-Language (Sorted)
44892   top_dir         pascal=33176,php=10293,sh=1423


Totals grouped by language (dominant language first):
pascal:       33176 (73.90%)
php:          10293 (22.93%)
sh:            1423 (3.17%)

Total Physical Source Lines of Code (SLOC)                = 44,892
Development Effort Estimate, Person-Years (Person-Months) = 10.86 (130.31)
 (Basic COCOMO model, Person-Months = 2.4 * (KSLOC**1.05))
Schedule Estimate, Years (Months)                         = 1.33 (15.91)
 (Basic COCOMO model, Months = 2.5 * (person-months**0.38))
Estimated Average Number of Developers (Effort/Schedule)  = 8.19
Total Estimated Cost to Develop                           = $ 1,466,963
 (average salary = $56,286/year, overhead = 2.40).
SLOCCount, Copyright (C) 2001-2004 David A. Wheeler
SLOCCount is Open Source Software/Free Software, licensed under the GNU GPL.
SLOCCount comes with ABSOLUTELY NO WARRANTY, and you are welcome to
redistribute it under certain conditions as specified by the GNU GPL license;
see the documentation for details.
Please credit this data as "generated using David A. Wheeler's 'SLOCCount'."
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<?php
passthru('wc -l `find . -iname "*.php"`');
?>

Just run this on your current directory where all the php files are placed, it will display count lines on browser.

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On windows from a command line:

findstr /R /N "^" *.php | find /C ":"

Thanks to this article.

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