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I created a simple bubblesorting script here that takes in arrays and sorts them, This is only a snippet of the code. But its the code that sorts it. I want to make it so Instead of making nine or so comparisons for example on every pass, to modify the bubble sort to make eight or one less comparisons on the second pass, seven on the third pass, and so on. I am totally lost how to implement that. What would be the best idea for that?

        int bubbleSortArray(int array[])
        {
            for(int i=0;i<10;i++)
            {
                for(int j=0;j<i;j++)
                {
                    if(array[i]>array[j])
                    {
                        swap(array[i], array[j]);
                        amountOfSwaps += 1;
                    }
                }
            }

        printArray(array);
        return amountOfSwaps;

        }


       void swap(int & value1, int & value2)
       {
              int temp=value1; 
              value1=value2;
              value2=temp;
       }
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your code does 0 on the first pass, 1 on the second pass, two on the third pass, etc. You're effectively already doing it. –  Mooing Duck Oct 26 '11 at 22:48
    
Oh oh wait is that becuase of the second forloop within my code? If i hda the single forloop then it would compare them all right? Maybei just missed it haha –  sonicboom Oct 26 '11 at 22:51
    
The "nieve" version that does nine each pass has an inner loop of for(int j=0;j<10;j++) Yours is already "optimized" in that way –  Mooing Duck Oct 26 '11 at 22:51
    
Wait so i already tackled the optomized version here? –  sonicboom Oct 26 '11 at 22:54
    
Yes, you did. It's incorrect (as mergeconflict observed), but you already have the optimization you wanted. –  Mooing Duck Oct 26 '11 at 23:01
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your code is already doing what you are looking for. Since j iterates to the length i, it grows by one larger each time. I think you are being confused because your code is actually implementing it backwards from your English in the question ;)

Here is a sample array, and the modifications that would be made at each iteration. The parenthesis denote what part of the array is being checked in each iteration:

(7)5 3 8 6 9 4 2 0 1
(7 5)3 8 6 9 4 2 0 1
(7 5 3)8 6 9 4 2 0 1
(8 7 5 3)6 9 4 2 0 1
(8 7 6 5 3)9 4 2 0 1
(9 8 7 6 5 3)4 2 0 1
(9 8 7 6 5 4 3)2 0 1
(9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2)0 1
(9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 0)1
(9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0)

As you can see the first time through nothing is actually done, nor ever will be because you are comparing one element against itself. The second time through you are now comparing two elements, then three, then so on.

To make your code start with comparing them all, and then doing one less each time (as your question states) you would modify you loop to the following (note j<10-i):

    for(int i=0;i<10;i++)
    {
        for(int j=0;j<10-i;j++)
        {

Either way it amounts to the same thing and will work in the end. You could further skip the first comparison against itself by setting i = 1:

for(int i=1;i<10;i++)
    {
        for(int j=0;j<10-i;j++)
        {

This will leave off the first comparison above, which is the other optimization you were looking for.

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1  
however, his code has a bug, which shows clearly if the input array starts reverse sorted. –  Mooing Duck Oct 26 '11 at 23:28
    
Wait so this would basically compare one less every time right? –  sonicboom Oct 26 '11 at 23:29
    
mystycs, correct. Your code actually does the opposite. Starts by comparing a few, and does one more each time. –  Andrew Dunaway Oct 26 '11 at 23:33
    
Awesome i actualyl edited it a little bit i used for(int j=0;j<i-1;j++) { –  sonicboom Oct 26 '11 at 23:43
    
@Andrew the sorting in your diagram looks more like insert sort rather than a bubble sort. –  greatwolf Oct 26 '11 at 23:47
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I think you've got your loop on j a bit backwards. I think you need something like:

for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
    for (int j = 1; j < 10 - i; j++) {
        // ...
    }
}
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Oh im sorting descending here –  sonicboom Oct 26 '11 at 22:52
    
I saw that, but assumed his code worked and that it worked either way. Now that I think on it, you're right. His version shouldn't work. –  Mooing Duck Oct 26 '11 at 22:53
    
Wait so im lost i already did the optomization here? –  sonicboom Oct 26 '11 at 22:58
    
Oh i see i+1 means that it will compare after the last number right? Thsi is what i wanted. –  sonicboom Oct 26 '11 at 23:08
    
Heh, I had a bug too. Fixed. The point is that after the first iteration of the outer i loop, the last element in the array will be correctly sorted; after the second iteration, the last two elements will be correctly sorted, and so on. –  mergeconflict Oct 26 '11 at 23:29
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Note that a distinquishing property of a bubblesort is that it checks whether a swap was performed at all for each pass. If it didn't swap then everything is in order and you can break early. Something like this:

int bubbleSort(int *arry, size_t size)
{
  bool swapped;
  size_t upper_bound = size;
  int amountOfSwaps = 0;

  do
  {
    swapped = false;
    for(int i = 1; i < upper_bound; ++i)
    {
      if(arry[i] < arry[i - 1])
      {
        swap(arry[i], arry[i - 1]);
        swapped = true;
        ++amountOfSwaps;
      }
    }
    --upper_bound;
  }while(swapped);

  return amountOfSwaps;
}
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I don't think that's a distinguishing property. It's simply a common property. What he has is still a bubble-sort. It could just be faster. –  Mooing Duck Oct 26 '11 at 23:12
    
@Moo I think this property is worth mentioning because it helps differentiate between the different types of sorts. While the OP could keep the double nested for's, it'll keep iterating even if the array's already sorted. –  greatwolf Oct 27 '11 at 0:05
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