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I was trying out some things with lists in the interactive interpreter and I noticed this:

>>> list = range(1, 11)
>>> for i in list:
...     list.remove(i)
...
>>> list
[2, 4, 6, 8, 10]

Can anyone explain why it left even numbers? This is confusing me right now... Thanks a lot.

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for i in list[:] or for i in tuple(list) should solve your problem, since either the first one will make a slice copy, or the second one will make a new immutable object (tuple). –  John Doe Oct 26 '11 at 22:46
1  
Standard warning: it's a bad habit to name your lists "list" because that clobbers the builtin type list. –  DSM Oct 26 '11 at 22:47
    
Good point! :) I didn't think about it when I named it "list". (Probably had to do with the author naming his "list") –  John Doe Oct 26 '11 at 22:48
3  
    
You've committed one of the classic blunders! Don't modify a list while iterating over it. –  Paul McGuire Oct 27 '11 at 5:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

It isn't safe to modify a list that you are iterating over.

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I have worked that out now... Still. This confused me. –  Bridgo Oct 26 '11 at 22:56

My guess is that the for loop is implemented like the following:

list = range(1, 11)

i = 0
while i < len(list):
    list.remove(list[i])
    i += 1

print(list)

Every time an element is removed, the "next" element slides into its spot, but i gets incremented anyway, skipping 2 elements.

But yes, ObscureRobot is right, it's not really safe to do this (and this is probably undefined behavior).

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It actually is defined, to behave just as shown by the OP. –  Paul McGuire Oct 27 '11 at 5:57
    
@Paul Sorry I meant that the for loop code was undefined, at least according to the Python docs –  Owen Oct 27 '11 at 7:14

If you want to modify a list whilst iterating over it, work from back to front:

lst = range(1, 11)
for i in reversed(lst):
    lst.remove(i)
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Why does that work? It's a nice solution... –  Bridgo Oct 26 '11 at 22:57
    
@Bridgo. If you remove an item from the front of the list, all the other items have to move down; but if you remove from the back, the other items are left unchanged. –  ekhumoro Oct 26 '11 at 22:59
    
Ahh.. Thanks lot. That makes a lot of sense. –  Bridgo Oct 26 '11 at 23:01
    
The nice thing about reversed() is that it doesn't even create a copy of the list, like some recommend doing. –  kindall Oct 27 '11 at 2:37

I find this easiest to explain using Python:

>>> for iteration, i in enumerate(lst):
...     print 'Begin iteration', iteration, 'where lst =', str(lst), 'and the value at index', iteration, 'is', lst[iteration]
...     lst.remove(i)
...     print 'End iteration', iteration, 'where lst =', str(lst), 'with', i, 'removed\n'
... 
Begin iteration 0 where lst = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10] and the value at index 0 is 1
End iteration 0 where lst = [2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10] with 1 removed

Begin iteration 1 where lst = [2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10] and the value at index 1 is 3
End iteration 1 where lst = [2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10] with 3 removed

Begin iteration 2 where lst = [2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10] and the value at index 2 is 5
End iteration 2 where lst = [2, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10] with 5 removed

Begin iteration 3 where lst = [2, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10] and the value at index 3 is 7
End iteration 3 where lst = [2, 4, 6, 8, 9, 10] with 7 removed

Begin iteration 4 where lst = [2, 4, 6, 8, 9, 10] and the value at index 4 is 9
End iteration 4 where lst = [2, 4, 6, 8, 10] with 9 removed

Note that it's a bad idea to (a) modify a list while iterating over it and (b) call a list "list".

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