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I have the following code which returns an error.

The line:

return first;

says:

incompatible types, required: char[]

It seems like something simple, but I can't figure it out. I am trying to display the values from invoking methodB.

Also, you will notice I have commented an if statement as #4. Can someone further my understanding a bit.

Does this if statement update the value held by the variable first IF the value held in the current element in alphas comes before the current value of first?

Hope this makes sense and someone can help. Getting late and my brain isn't working any more. Java is going to make or break me!

package openuniversity;

public class Main
{

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        Main m = new Main();
        char [] alp = m.methodB();

        for (char b: alp)
        {
            System.out.println(b);
        }
    }

    public static char[] methodB()
    {

        char [] alphas = {'s','a','u','s','a','g','e'};
        char first = alphas[0];
        for (int i= 1; i < alphas.length; i++) //3
        {
            if (alphas[i] < first) //4
            {
            first = alphas[i];
            }
        }
        return first;
    }
}
share|improve this question
2  
methodB is declared to return char[] but you're trying to return a single char. – mu is too short Oct 27 '11 at 0:54
    
Thank you. Would you be able to tell me what I need to change? Removing the char [] from my method header isn't fixing the problem :/ – Ali Lumsden Oct 27 '11 at 0:57
1  
I would seriously consider a beginner's guide to programming / java. You declare the method to return a specific type of thing, and you return that type of thing. If you try and return a different type of thing, it won't compile. – Brian Roach Oct 27 '11 at 1:00
    
I am studying a module with the Open University (UK) which has left me absolutley stranded. The tutor is useless and confuses me more than helps me. I have a fantastic text that I am working through but I need to clear this up for an assessment. They are forcing me to run before I can walk and this is the result :( – Ali Lumsden Oct 27 '11 at 1:02
1  
"I have the following code which returns an error." No it doesn't, it gives a compilation error. – EJP Oct 27 '11 at 1:31
up vote 0 down vote accepted
package openuniversity;

public class Main
{

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        Main m = new Main();
        char alp = m.methodB();

        System.out.println(alp);
    }

    public static char methodB()
    {

        char [] alphas = {'s','a','u','s','a','g','e'};
        char first = alphas[0];
        for (int i= 1; i < alphas.length; i++) //3
        {
            if (alphas[i] < first) //4
            {
            first = alphas[i];
            }
        }
        return first;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you ever so much. – Ali Lumsden Oct 27 '11 at 1:08

Your function signature says you're returning a char[]:

public static char[] methodB()

But you actually return a char:

char first = alphas[0];
// ...
return first;

It's not entirely clear what you want to do, but you need to either change the signature to return a single char:

public static char methodB()

And change where it's used:

char alp = m.methodB();

Or make methodB actually return a char[]. The problem is I don't know what it's actually supposed to return. I'd suggest giving the function a better name. You may want to take a look at Lists.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you Brendan - this helps me kind of understand where I've gone wrong. As my comment above states, I am doing this as part of an online course which has left me stranded and I have no idea what the method is meant to do (no explanation was given) or what it is doing. But I got the returned value, which is partly what I wanted. Many thanks for your help, must appreciated! – Ali Lumsden Oct 27 '11 at 1:09

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