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I have files that are named like C1_1_B_(1)IMG1511.jpg and I want to split them up into a list where i get back as

 C1
 1
 B
 (1)
 IMG1511.jpg

trying to figure out if i need to do this with sed or awk or regex or even what that would look like i could do it in applescript but I would rather call shell command as it is much faster

EDIT

Ok so now its changed a bit and I can figure out how to fix it

example are

"P24-M_(1)Lighter_Ray_Logo_Full_Color.jpg" 
"P24_(1)24x36loren.jpg" 

so _(*) indicates where I want to stop listing so i end up with

P24
M
(1)
Lighter_Ray_Logo_Full_Color.jpg

and

P24
(1)
24x36loren.jpg
share|improve this question
    
For clarification, will the file names always have 3 underscores and one pair of parenthesis? –  Alfred Fazio Oct 27 '11 at 2:01
    
it could have more underscores but the parens will always be follwed by some text and dot extension thanks for asking about that –  mcgrailm Oct 27 '11 at 2:03
    
If it was just the underscores, IFS=_ set ... would be a good solution. For the parenthesis, this is not suitable, so echo | sed is probably the way to go. –  tripleee Oct 27 '11 at 4:46

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Translate _ to new lines:

echo "C1_1_B_(1)IMG1511.jpg" | tr '_' '\n'

Output:

C1
1
B
(1)IMG1511.jpg

Although, it looks like you want to split on ) as well. No can do with tr, but...

echo "C1_1_B_(1)IMG1511.jpg" | tr '_' '\n' | sed -e 's/)/)\
/'

There's a linefeed inside the replacement string, which is needed for Mac. On other *nix OS's, a simple escape works:

echo "C1_1_B_(1)IMG1511.jpg" | tr '_' '\n' | sed -e 's/)/)\n/'

Output:

C1
1
B
(1)
IMG1511.jpg
share|improve this answer
1  
echo "C1_1_B_(1)IMG1511.jpg" | sed 's/)/)_/g' | tr '_' '\n' –  Alfred Fazio Oct 27 '11 at 2:13
2  
@Alfred Fazio: may as well take it further (less)... sed 's/)/)_/;s/_/\n/g' ... (using only one utility) –  Peter.O Oct 27 '11 at 9:38
    
@fered when I use just sed I get C1n1nBn(1)nIMG1511.jpg so there are no returns why is in not making the new lines and just putting n there –  mcgrailm Oct 27 '11 at 12:53
    
@mcgrailm. I have no real idea why it would be doing that. Maybe you are using a different sed (mine is GNU 4.2.1). Try it this way, sed -e 's/)/)_/' -e 's/_/\n/g' .. If you have a differnt sed, try using \\n ???? –  Peter.O Oct 27 '11 at 21:53
    
@Bohemian can you look at my edit see if you have any ideas –  mcgrailm Dec 6 '11 at 13:35

Would this do?

 <<<"C1_1_B_(1)IMG1511.jpg" sed -r 'y/_/\n/;s/\([^)]*\)/&\n/g;'
share|improve this answer
    
... The * should be +) –  Peter.O Oct 27 '11 at 8:15
    
s/([^)]\*)/&\n/g; caters for left paren, followed by anything but a right paren or nothing, followed by a right paren. –  potong Oct 27 '11 at 8:34
    
... but when I run it, it keeps (1)IMG1511.jpg all on the same line. The OP wants (1) and IMG1511.jpg on different lines... The \* is escaping * and that causes a not-matched situation... Maybe we are using diffferent versions of sed ... I'm using: GNU sed version 4.2.1 –  Peter.O Oct 27 '11 at 9:10
    
Your right fered - I amended it from sed -r option (which I've now reverted to) forgetting that '()' didn't need quoting. The above version should work. –  potong Oct 27 '11 at 9:14
    
@fered this is my attempt to handle your test data sed -r 's/([^_])(\([^)]*\))/\1_\2/g;y/_/\n/;s/\([^)]*\)/&\n/g;:a;s/\(([^)\n]*)\n/(\1_/g‌​;ta' –  potong Oct 27 '11 at 14:40

I know it's not sed/awk, but here's something that would work in perl:

#!/usr/bin/perl

while(<STDIN>) {
  my($line) = $_;
  chomp($line);

  my @values = split(/_|(\(\d+\))/, $line);

    foreach my $val (@values) {
    if ( $val !~ m/^$/)
    {
        print "$val\n";
    }
  }
}
exit 0;
share|improve this answer
    
iKeya thats cool but its hard to put that into applescript i really need something small like one or two lines as I don't want to add the complexity of a required file to this job –  mcgrailm Dec 6 '11 at 15:32

If the filename is stored in $P, the following works with zsh:

myarr=${(s/_/)$(echo $P | sed 's/)/)_/g')}

This creates an actual array.

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This handles filenames which contain _ ( ) in other places.

<<< '
C1_1_B_(1)IMG151).jpg
C1_1_B_(1)IMG_(4444).jpg
C(22)2_1_22_333_B_(144)I_M_G_(_1511).jpg
' sed -nr '# isolate, process and print first section 
             s/^([^(]+)_/\1\n/;h
             s/(.*)\n.*/\1/
             s/([^_]+)_/\1\n/gp;x
           # process the second section 
             s/.*\n(.*)/\1/
             s/([^)]+\))/\1\n/p
           ';exit
share|improve this answer
str="C1_1_B_(1)IMG1511.jpg"
ary=( $(IFS=_; echo $str) )

for ((idx=0; idx < ${#ary[@]}; idx++)); do echo ${ary[$idx]}; done

outputs

C1
1
B
(1)IMG1511.jpg
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