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I am mallocing an array of c strings. After releasing it, I get the following error:

Assembler(87536) malloc: *** error for object 0x108500840: pointer being freed was not allocated *** set a breakpoint in malloc_error_break to debug

Why is that? I am pretty sure I am doing the malloc correctly. I'm pretty experienced with memory management, but I am not sure why this is giving me an error. The array is should hold three strings, each of which is 2 characters long.

Here is how I am mallocing the array:

char **reg_store;
reg_store = malloc(3 * (sizeof(char*)));
if (reg_store == NULL) {
     fprintf(Out, "Out of memory\n");
     exit(1);
}

for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
    reg_store[i] = malloc(2 * sizeof(char));
    if (reg_store[i] == NULL) {
          fprintf(Out, "Out of memory\n");
          exit(1);
    }
}

Here is how I am freeing it:

for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
    free(reg_store[i]);
}
free(reg_store);

Here is what I have in between:

// Keeps a reference to which register has been parsed for storage

int count = 0;
char *reg = NULL;
char *inst_ptr // POINTS TO SOME STRING. EXAMPLE: $t2, $t1, $a0

while (1) {

    // Parses the string in inst_ptr with dollar, comma and space as a delimiter.
    reg = parse_token(inst_ptr, " $,\n", &inst_ptr, NULL);

    if (reg == NULL || *reg == '#') {
        break;
    }

    reg_store[count] = reg;
    count++;
    free(reg);
}

I am printing out reg after I call parse_token and it does print out correctly. I am also printing out reg_store[count] and it does also print out correctly.

share|improve this question
    
This code causes no memory errors for me with highest memory debug options set. please post your whole code including the thing in the middle. –  Dani Oct 27 '11 at 2:54
    
I added the code in the middle. Please check it. Thanks –  darksky Oct 27 '11 at 3:06
    
you do sizeof(char*) at the beginning, but then when you run your for each you call sizeof(char) instead. Is char a pointer in your project? If I'm right, in the first call you are getting the size of the pointer of char(been awhile since playing with c), instead of the size of char on your system. –  kelton52 Oct 27 '11 at 3:09
    
Either that or that's correct, and you are de-referencing char, but then in your second call you aren't. –  kelton52 Oct 27 '11 at 3:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your problem is here:

reg_store[count] = reg;
free(reg);

and later

free(reg_store[i]);

reg is already freed and you free it another time (not talking about the problems with using it later). to fix this replace

reg_store[count] = reg;

with

strcpy(reg_store[count], reg);

or as suggested in the comments, since you know its two charaters, its better to memcpy it:

memcpy(reg_store[count], reg, 2);
share|improve this answer
    
That was it! Shallow copied instead of deep copying the items. Rookie mistake. Thank you! –  darksky Oct 27 '11 at 3:15
    
And I'd suggest using something other than strcpy, as it is a pathway to buffer overflow land. I'd suggest strncpy, but it has some strange behavior of it's own. Since you know the size is two characters, I'd probably say to go ahead and do a memcpy. –  Michael Price Oct 27 '11 at 3:16

I would suggest adding some printfs (or use the debugger) to see the values of all the malloced pointers just after they have been malloced. Then do the same just before they are freed, to make sure they are the same. Perhaps there is some other rogue code elsewhere in the program that is stomping over memory.

share|improve this answer
    
Please see the edit. I added the code in between. –  darksky Oct 27 '11 at 3:07

Your problem is in the "in between" code, in particular, right here:

reg_store[count] = reg;
count++;
free(reg);

You allocated reg_store[count] with malloc during your set up, then you overwrite the allocated value with reg and then free reg. The result is a memory leak from the original pointers that were in reg_store and a double-free on each element of reg_store when you try to clean everything up.

You need to copy reg into the memory already allocated in reg_store[count] (watching the size of course) or don't allocate any space for the elements of reg_store before the "in between" code at all.

share|improve this answer

The error was already pointed out so no need to write it again. I can however point out that i don't like the way you are handling errors.

void freeRegStore(char** reg_store)
{
    int i;
    if (reg_store != NULL)
    {
        for (i = 0; i < 3; i++)
            free(reg_store[i]);

        free(reg_store);
    }
}

char** allocRegStore()
{
    int i;
    char **reg_store;
    reg_store = calloc(3 * (sizeof(char*)), 1);
    if (reg_store != NULL)
    {
        for (i = 0; i < 3; i++)
        {
            reg_store[i] = malloc(2 * sizeof(char));
            if (reg_store[i] == NULL)
            {
                freeRegStore(reg_store);
                return NULL;
            }
        }
    }
    return reg_store;
}

In this method, the function allocRegStore will return NULL if there was not enough memory without leaving pieces around. Then you can handle this case in main and not in the allocation function itself. I disagree with the use of printf and exit inside functions.

int main()
{
    char** reg_store = allocRegStore();

    if (reg_store == NULL)
    {
        puts("Out of memory");
        return 1;
    }

    ... do your stuff

    freeRegStore();
    return 0;
}

I can also say that the memory used by this program will never go out of memory :) i would not worry about that.

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