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How to get the first directory name in a relative path, given that they can be different accepted directory separators?

For example:

foo\bar\abc.txt -> foo
bar/foo/foobar -> bar
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5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Works with both forward and back slash

static string GetRootFolder(string path)
{
    while (true)
    {
        string temp = Path.GetDirectoryName(path);
        if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(temp))
            break;
        path = temp;
    }
    return path;
}
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Ooh, that's much more succint. –  bobbymcr Oct 27 '11 at 4:05
    
Don't think that will return the first directory as asked. But since it has been marked as the answer seems like it serves the purpose...in which case the question is incorrect. Please update –  aateeque Nov 7 '11 at 16:27
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The most robust solution would be to use DirectoryInfo and FileInfo. On a Windows NT-based system it should accept either forward or backslashes for separators.

using System;
using System.IO;

internal class Program
{
    private static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(GetTopRelativeFolderName(@"foo\bar\abc.txt")); // prints 'foo'
        Console.WriteLine(GetTopRelativeFolderName("bar/foo/foobar")); // prints 'bar'
        Console.WriteLine(GetTopRelativeFolderName("C:/full/rooted/path")); // ** throws
    }

    private static string GetTopRelativeFolderName(string relativePath)
    {
        if (Path.IsPathRooted(relativePath))
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("Path is not relative.", "relativePath");
        }

        FileInfo fileInfo = new FileInfo(relativePath);
        DirectoryInfo workingDirectoryInfo = new DirectoryInfo(".");
        string topRelativeFolderName = string.Empty;
        DirectoryInfo current = fileInfo.Directory;
        bool found = false;
        while (!found)
        {
            if (current.FullName == workingDirectoryInfo.FullName)
            {
                found = true;
            }
            else
            {
                topRelativeFolderName = current.Name;
                current = current.Parent;
            }
        }

        return topRelativeFolderName;
    }
}
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Seems like you could just use the string.Split() method on the string, then grab the first element.
example (untested):

string str = "foo\bar\abc.txt";
string str2 = "bar/foo/foobar";


string[] items = str.split(new char[] {'/', '\'}, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries);

Console.WriteLine(items[0]); // prints "foo"

items = str2.split(new char[] {'/', '\'}, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries);
Console.WriteLine(items[0]); // prints "bar"
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Here is another example in case your path if following format:

string path = "c:\foo\bar\abc.txt"; // or c:/foo/bar/abc.txt
string root = Path.GetPathRoot(path); // root == c:\
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Is there any OS that uses the c:/foo/bar/abc.txt convention? –  jb. Oct 27 '11 at 4:04
    
You need to escape backslashes or use verbatim strings (@" ... "). –  bobbymcr Oct 27 '11 at 4:32
    
Escaping is necessary, I agree, else string is invalid. Regardless of conventions, example targets user's question and if "c:/foo/bar/abc.txt" supplied, code still works. –  Dan Oct 27 '11 at 12:49
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Based on the question you ask, the following should work:

    public string GetTopLevelDir(string filePath)
    {
        string temp = Path.GetDirectoryName(filePath);
        if(temp.Contains("\\"))
        {
            temp = temp.Substring(0, temp.IndexOf("\\"));
        }
        else if (temp.Contains("//"))
        {
            temp = temp.Substring(0, temp.IndexOf("\\"));
        }
        return temp;
    }

When passed foo\bar\abc.txt it will foo as wanted- same for the / case

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