Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to do the following... (Foo is a class)

void Main() 
{
    var foos = ...
    DoSomeWork(foos);
    // I want all foos to have Bar set to 42
}

public static void DoSomeWork(IEnumberable<Foo> foos) 
{
    foreach (var foo in foos)
    {
        foo.Bar = 42;
    }
}

class Foo 
{
    String blahblah;
    Int32 Bar;
}

But all the foos have their original values. How do I change them on a ref parameter?

share|improve this question
    
Is foo a struct or a class? –  Hasan Khan Oct 27 '11 at 5:39
    
class, not a struct –  Nick Strupat Oct 27 '11 at 5:40
    
ref is not needed for the collection (foos). –  leppie Oct 27 '11 at 5:40
2  
Did you call ToList method against your LINQ query? Take into attention a deferred execution nature of LINQ queries. –  Yuriy Rozhovetskiy Oct 27 '11 at 5:45
1  
@YuriyRozhovetskiy post that as answer –  Hasan Khan Oct 27 '11 at 5:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It could be that foos is a generating IEnumerable. Example:

IEnumerable<Foo> GetFoos()
{
  yield return new Foo {};
  yield return new Foo {};
  yield return new Foo {};
}

var foos = GetFoos();

You can never mutate the values being generated, as they will be freshly created each time you iterate over foos.

Now if you did the following as suggested by @YuriyRozhovetskiy, it will work.

var foos = GetFoos().ToList();

Now we can mutate happily :)

share|improve this answer
1  
+1. this is one of those things about an IEnumerable that you never think about until its bites you once or twice. –  nathan gonzalez Oct 27 '11 at 5:53

Since you don't force LINQ query execution with methods like ToList or ToArray, each time you enumerate over the query it have executed all over again. You need to cache query results with the ToList method and then pass that list to the DoSomeWork method.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for mentioning it first :) –  leppie Oct 27 '11 at 5:53

This is strange, it should work for reference type (class) and it would not compile for value type (struct).

First of all, you don't need to pass ref IEnumerable to DoSomeWork, because you don't want to change the collection object, only modify elements inside.

I tried to reproduce your case, but it works OK, code below. Could you give some more details?

  • What collection you are passing (List, Set)?
  • If Bar is property - how it's implemented?
  • Is Foo a reference type (class)?

Working code:

class Foo
{
    public Foo(int bar, int baz)
    {
        Bar = bar;
        Baz = baz;
    }
    public int Bar { get; set; }
    public int Baz;
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var foos = new List<Foo>(new[]
        {
            new Foo(1, 2),
            new Foo(3, 4),
            new Foo(5, 6)
        });
        DoSomeWork(foos);
    }

    private static void DoSomeWork(IEnumerable<Foo> foos)
    {
        foreach (var foo in foos)
        {
            foo.Bar = 42;
            foo.Baz = 42;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
You make too many assumptions why it should work, but no suggestions why it will not work. –  leppie Oct 27 '11 at 5:51

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.