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I'm looking for a Java Map Class that can contains two or more keys for one value. It almost like MultiKeyMap in apache common collections, but it can use only one of the keys to retrieve the value instead of using all of keys.

For example to create an entry in the map for value "Hello World" with keys "key1" and "key2":

    map.put("Hello World", "key1", "key2");

Then if I want to get the value, I can use two possible ways:

    String value = map.get("key1");

or

    String value = map.get("key2");


In MultiKeyMap, you need to specify all of the keys to retrive the value:

    String value = map.get("key1", "key2");


UPDATE:
People tell me to use regular Map class but I'm not sure if a map with two keys pointing to a same value will generate two duplicate values or not in memory. So anyone can confirm this?

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It's unclear to me why using a standard Map wouldn't work. Map can contain mappings from different keys to the same value. Is the issue that you want one removal to remove all other related keys? –  Mark Peters Oct 27 '11 at 5:51
    
Well if you don't specify both keys, there can be several values returned, map.get("key1") should return a collection of strings –  Maurice Perry Oct 27 '11 at 5:52
    
@Maurice: Where does the OP say he wants to map one key to multiple values? I'm not sure you're reading the question the same way I am (or the OP is). –  Mark Peters Oct 27 '11 at 5:53
    
@Mark Peters: Well, MultiKeyMap was mentionned, and if only one value can be mapped to a key, a regular Map can do the job. –  Maurice Perry Oct 27 '11 at 6:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Why not just repeat the Value for each Key in a regular map?

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Yes, it can use that way but I'm not sure if a map with two keys pointing to a same value will generate two duplicate values or not in memory. So anyone can confirm this? –  suud Oct 27 '11 at 6:03
3  
Map will just hold the reference to the object, and not duplicate it. –  Francisco Spaeth Oct 27 '11 at 6:09
    
Putting thing into a map do not generate your objects, they already exist. Are you worried about performance? What size Map and objects are we talking about? –  dbrin Oct 27 '11 at 6:09
    
@DmitryB: I see, so it's like that. Ok then I will just use the regular Map (unless there are other people here can suggest better solutions). Yes, I'm worried about two things: performance and memory spaces. The Map will contains around 8000+ unique keys, but the unique values would be halves of it (4000+). –  suud Oct 27 '11 at 6:15
    
@suud, Say your map uses 128 MB of memory (16 KB per key/value) This is worth about $1 of memory. I would say this is worth you spending no more than a couple of minutes on. If the map is much smaller than this, spend less. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Oct 27 '11 at 7:25

Hm, it seems to me like you can approximate what you want by doing:

map.put("key1", "Hello World");
map.put("key2", "Hello World");

Then key1 and key2 will both return "Hello World".

Of course, what this won't do is consolidate logically duplicate values down to a single reference. But would you even want to do that? It seems like such a thing could lead to confusing side-effects down the road, if you are placing any sort of mutable types in the map.

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Unfortunately, there are no 2nd prizes here today –  Bohemian Oct 27 '11 at 5:53
    
Yes, it can use that way but I'm not sure if a map with two keys pointing to a same value will generate two duplicate values or not in memory. So anyone can confirm this? –  suud Oct 27 '11 at 6:03
2  
The map actually holds references to objects, so two different keys can be mapped to two references for one value. If you use the string literal "Hello World" twice in your class there will only be one string instance created. You can verify this by using the == operator with your two map values to check if the references refer to the same object. –  prunge Oct 27 '11 at 6:33
    
@prunge: +1, good answer, thx. –  suud Oct 27 '11 at 6:36
1  
I would add that in Java doesn't create ever create two strings with the same value (unless you do some sort of reflection trick). So two strings that say "Hello World" are always the same instance. –  Joe Oct 27 '11 at 14:10

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