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I am using svn on MacOS X. I have set up a repository with access permissions similar to the following:

[/]
*=rw

[/group1]
*=
me=rw
groupMember1=rw
groupMember2=rw

Here "me" is my user name. When I do an "svn ls https://me@ourserver.com/svn/" then I correctly get:

/group1

Likewise, when I do an "svn ls https://me@ourserver.com/svn/group1" then I correctly get listed all files in that folder. Similarly, when I browse the repo as user "me" in my web browser I can access all information as I should.

However, when I do a checkout... "svn co https://me@ourserver.com/svn/" then only a "shallow copy" of the folder group1 is checked out, the files within that folder are not. Why is that? What am I missing?

P.S. I can use svn co to check out all group folders individually. This works. However, it is quite inconvenient.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Try specifying checkout depth implicitly, it might be not related to permissions (your access permissions seem correct).

svn checkout --depth infinity https://me@ourserver.com/svn/" my_working_copy
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--depth infinity is the default value. The @ notation for specifying a username is only supported for svn+ssh://. –  Bert Huijben Oct 27 '11 at 9:38
    
I remember when I once set to immediates it had been cached somehow IIRC –  pmod Oct 27 '11 at 10:10
    
Once you checked out a working copy the depth is stored in the working copy. But before you checkout there is no other default then infinity. –  Bert Huijben Oct 27 '11 at 10:49
    
OK, I my thought was almost the same:) so it's easy to check and we don't now what exactly Eric does –  pmod Oct 27 '11 at 11:33
    
@Eric so, did you solve this issue? –  pmod Dec 5 '12 at 16:53
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