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I'm making a tree that has several different node types: a binary node, a unary node, and a terminal node. I've got an ABC that all the nodes inherit from. I'm trying to write a recursive copy constructor for the tree like so:

class gpnode
{
public:
  gpnode() {};
  virtual ~gpnode() {};
  gpnode(const gpnode& src) {};

  gpnode* parent;
}

class bnode:gpnode
{
public:
  bnode() {//stuff};
  ~bnode() {//recursive delete};

  bnode(const bnode& src)
  {
    lnode = gpnode(src.lnode);
    rnode = gpnode(src.rnode);

    lnode->parent = this;
    rnode->parent = this;
  }

  gpnode* lnode;
  gpnode* rnode;
}

class unode:gpnode
{
public:
  unode() {//stuff};
  ~unode() {//recursive delete};

  unode(const unode& src)
  {
    node = gpnode(src.node);

    node->parent = this;
  }

  gpnode* node;
}

My problem is that I can't do

node = gpnode(src.node);

because gpnode is a virtual class. I could do

node = unode(src.node);

but that doesn't work when the child of a unode is a bnode. How do I get it to intelligently call the copy constructor I need it to?

share|improve this question
1  
src.node is a pointer. The constructor you have have the reference as argument. I think it should be unode(*(src.node)) –  Abhinav Oct 27 '11 at 8:01
    
True. In my actual code, I believe it's correct, but here I just forgot that detail when writing the example. –  LinuxMercedes Oct 27 '11 at 19:04
    
LinuxMercedes >because gpnode is a virtual class what do u mean by virtual class here? –  Abhinav Oct 28 '11 at 7:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You need to implement cloning.

   class base
   {
   public:
       virtual base* clone() const = 0;
   }

   class derived : public base
   {
   public:
       derived(){}; // default ctor
       derived(const derived&){}; // copy ctor

       virtual derived* clone() const { return new derived(*this); };
   };

Etceteras

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for getting the clone function right (too many people forget either the const qualifier or the covariance of the return type). –  Matthieu M. Oct 27 '11 at 8:10
1  
I guess it's possible to automate clone implementation with curiously recurring pattern –  user396672 Oct 27 '11 at 8:23
    
Regardless of this being an old question, you got me curious. Why is const needed with clone exactly? –  Yannick Aug 6 at 16:33
1  
@Yannick, same reason we use the const qualifier on any member function - we're not modifying anything, and a clone should not modify anything. :) –  Moo-Juice Aug 7 at 7:51
    
Tahns a lot for the answer :) –  Yannick Aug 14 at 0:19

To do this you have to provide a clone-method for your objects, that returns a pointer of the appropriate type. If all your classes have copy-constructors, that is as simple as that:

node* clone() const {
    return new node(*this);
}

Where node is the class you are writing the clone-method for. You would of course have to declare that method in your base-class:

virtual gpnode* clone() const = 0;
share|improve this answer

Use virtual constructor.

share|improve this answer
    
Pure link are generally frown upon, your answer would be better were you to cite an excerpt or present the link in some way in order to get people excited about visiting the link. –  Matthieu M. Oct 27 '11 at 8:13

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