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I need some hints or an example, how can i localize in a list a the list b, then replace it with list c.

a=[1,3,6,2,6,7,3,4,5,6,6,7,8]

input the b list (this is the sublist the program searches for in list a).

b=[6,7]

when found return me the indexes were the sublist has been found and replace it each time with c=[0,0], so the result will be

[1,3,6,2,0,0,3,4,5,6,0,0,8]
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4 Answers 4

Here's a more efficient approach than my first, using list-slicing:

>>> for i in xrange(len(a) - len(b) + 1):
...     if a[i:i+len(b)] == b:
...         a[i:i+len(b)] = c
... 
>>> a
[1, 3, 6, 2, 0, 0, 3, 4, 5, 6, 0, 0, 8]

First attempt, for posterity....

If you don't need the intermediate indices, here's one approach, using string functions and taking a functional approach, not modifying your list in-place.

>>> a_as_str = ','.join(str(i) for i in a)
>>> print a_as_str
1,3,6,2,6,7,3,4,5,6,6,7,8
>>> b_as_str = ','.join(str(i) for i in b)
>>> b_as_str
'6,7'
>>> c_as_str = ','.join(str(i) for i in c)
>>> c_as_str
'0,0'
>>> replaced = a_as_str.replace(b_as_str, c_as_str)
>>> replaced
'1,3,6,2,0,0,3,4,5,6,0,0,8'
>>> [int(i) for i in replaced.split(',')]
[1, 3, 6, 2, 0, 0, 3, 4, 5, 6, 0, 0, 8]

This can be refactored as:

>>> def as_str(l):
...     return ','.join(str(i) for i in l)
... 
>>> def as_list_of_ints(s):
...     return [int(i) for i in s.split(',')]
... 
>>> as_list_of_ints(as_str(a).replace(as_str(b), as_str(c)))
[1, 3, 6, 2, 0, 0, 3, 4, 5, 6, 0, 0, 8]
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@Downvoter, why? –  Johnsyweb Oct 27 '11 at 8:42
2  
Converting from integers to strings and back again is to me much less clear than directly searching the list. Also this has a significant performance penalty (though that may not be relevant in this case). –  amicitas Oct 27 '11 at 8:44
    
@amicitas: You're right... See edit. –  Johnsyweb Oct 27 '11 at 8:53
1  
+1 very compact list slicing loop. –  Serdalis Oct 27 '11 at 9:09
    
This is super readable and efficient, but there is one problem here: the substitution is being done in place while the step size is potentially (probably) smaller than the substitution size. This is a little tricky to get around since presumably you would want the first valid substitution to take place. –  amicitas Oct 28 '11 at 15:56

you can do something similar to (written in python 3.2, use xrange in python 2.x):

for i in range(0, len(a)):
    if a[i:i+len(b)] == b:
        a[i:i+len(b)] = c

this will account for lists of all sizes. This assumes list b == list c I don't know if that is what you want however, please state if it is not.

Output for lists:

a = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0]
b = [1,2]
c = [0,0]
Output:
[0, 0, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0]
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oh wow I didn't even see a list b, I'll edit the answer. EDIT: and done –  Serdalis Oct 27 '11 at 9:05
    
For the given values of a, b, c supplied in the question, this now returns a as [1, 3, 0, 0, 0, 0, 3, 4, 5, 6, 0, 0, 8] –  Johnsyweb Oct 27 '11 at 9:21
1  
Thanks for that, while fixing the alignment error I caused another, the for loop was only testing the first value ever, and now I get the solution you posted =d –  Serdalis Oct 27 '11 at 9:27
    
That's fixed it! I know this because it's now the same as mine, except you loop over one more index. –  Johnsyweb Oct 27 '11 at 9:32
1  
agreed, marked yours up, you did get to this answer first. –  Serdalis Oct 27 '11 at 9:35

I give you an example

li=[1,3,6,2,6,7,3,4,5,6,6,7,8]
for i  in range(len(li)): 
    if li[i:i + 2] == [3, 4]: 
        li[i:i + 2] = [0, 0]

I think that this code should work. If you want a more robust script I suggest you to check the occurrences of a substring in the original list an edit a copy (to avoid side-effect behaviors).

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1  
Some improvements: using the variable names used by the op, you can make the range like range(len(a) - len(b)); the if if a[i:i+len(b)] == b; the assignment a[i:i+len(b)] = c. –  jro Oct 27 '11 at 8:31

It is important also to consider what happens when the given pattern is created by the substitution.

I think this function should treat all cases as intended:

def replace(a, b, c):
    ii = 0
    while ii <= (len(a) - len(b) + 1):
        print(ii)
        if a[ii:ii+len(b)] == b:
            a[ii:ii+len(b)] = c
            ii += len(b)
        else:
            ii += 1
    return a


The output using the original example:

[1, 3, 6, 2, 0, 0, 3, 4, 5, 6, 0, 0, 8]


Here is an example where the substitution creates the search pattern:

a = [1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,6,6,7,7,1]
b = [6,7]
c = [0,6]

Output is as expected:

[1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 6, 0, 6, 7, 1]



Any ideas on how to do this a bit more concisely?

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