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u_char  ip_vhl;     /* version << 4 | header length >> 2 */

I can't get it right , how is this done ? can you give me examples on how to use this byte to store these 2 numbers knowing that each one is 4 bit

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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted
ip_vhl = (version << 4) | (headerlen & 0xf);

Then the byte will look like this:

VVVVHHHH

To get back the original values:

version = ip_vhl >> 4;
headerlen = ip_vhl & 0xf;
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If each number is 4 bits, you're going to use the 8-most lower bits of the character. In many cases, this will be all the bits there are.

Do it like so:

ip_vhl = ((version & 15) << 4) | (length & 15);

Assuming version is the one you want in the upper bits, and length is what you want in the lower-most bits. The & 15 makes sure each value only is 4 bits. This is mostly needed for the length value, to avoid overwriting bits dedicated to the version if length is larger than 15. The decimal constant 15 would be written in hex (as 0xf or 0x0f) by many people, it's a matter of style and taste which you find cleaner.

Another way of writing "an integer with the n right-most bits set to 1, and all other set to 0" is ((1 << n) - 1), and since here n = 4 we could use ((1 << 4) - 1), which of course evaluates to 15.

Your code seems to divide length down first and store that, if that's what you want to do you should do it before packing it into the single char, for clarity:

length >>= 2;  /* Convert from bytes to 32-bit words (or whatever). */
ip_vhl = ((version & 15) << 4) | (length & 15);
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4  
0xf instead of 15 would look nicer –  ThiefMaster Oct 27 '11 at 9:07
    
@ThiefMaster: It's a matter of taste, I guess ... It's one character longer. But I'll edit to mention it. –  unwind Oct 27 '11 at 9:13
    
I find hex cleaner for bitmasks because it's in a very direct correspondence with the bit pattern. Doesn't mean I always use hex, though ;-) –  Daniel Fischer Oct 30 '11 at 22:05
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Version (a) using bit fields

struct entry {
  unsigned char version : 4;
  unsigned char length  : 4;
} ip_vhl;

ip_vhl.version = version;
ip_vhl.length = length;

Version (b) arithmetics

ip_vhl = (version << 4) | (length & 0xF)
version = ip_vhl >> 4;
length  = ip_vhl & 0xf;
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1  
Bit-fields are very implementation-specific according to C99, the standard. Types other than _Bool and int (signed and unsigned) may not be supported. The order of bit-fields is implementation-defined. How much memory they will take is also implementation-specific (can take more than necessary). Same with alignment. –  Alexey Frunze Oct 27 '11 at 10:04
    
@Alex Specific usage depends on your needs. Bit fields can be very useful. –  Artyom Oct 27 '11 at 11:37
    
I didn't say they aren't/can't be useful. I simply warned that they may not be the right or portable solution. –  Alexey Frunze Oct 27 '11 at 11:40
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// Here we are trusting that version and length are both < 0xF
unsigned char ip_vhl = (unsigned char)version << 4 | (unsigned char)length;

unsigned char version = ip_vhl >> 4;
unsigned char length = ip_vhl & 0xF;
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Also, you can resort to a structure with bit fields:

typedef struct s_ip_vhl 
{
    int version : 4;
    int header_length : 4;
} ip_vhl_type;

ip_vhl_type my_ip_vhl;
my_ip_vhl.version = 4;
my_ip_vhl.header_length = 5;
unsigned char byte = *((byte*)(&my_ip_vhl));

Or you can pack the struct with a union with unsigned char to get the entire byte in one go:

typedef union u_ip_vhl
{
    typedef struct s_ip_vhl 
    {
        int version : 4;
        int header_length : 4;
    } ip_vhl_type;
    unsigned char byte;
} ip_vhl_union;
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See my comment to this answer –  Alexey Frunze Oct 27 '11 at 10:08
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