Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two strings which I'd like to compare: String and String:. Is there a library function that would return true when passed these two strings (but false for say String and OtherString)?

To be precise, I want to know whether one string is a prefix of another.

share|improve this question
2  
what about using good old string.compare()? –  Alok Save Oct 27 '11 at 9:11
    
you mean comparing first N characters? –  Donotalo Oct 27 '11 at 9:12
    
@Donotalo That would be ok, would be nice if it did it for me so I didn't need to go through the faff of working out n. –  Tom Medley Oct 27 '11 at 9:13
    
Well, strictly speaking one function which satisfies your requirements is the == operator. ;-) –  Frerich Raabe Oct 27 '11 at 9:14
    
@FrerichRaabe: no, it doesn't, he does not want to check whether they are the same, but rather whether they share a prefix –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 27 '11 at 9:37

11 Answers 11

up vote 20 down vote accepted

Use std::mismatch. Pass in the shorter string as the first iterator range and the longer as the second iterator range. The return is a pair of iterators, the first is the iterator in the first range and the second, in the second rage. If the first is end of the first range, then you know the the short string is the prefix of the longer string e.g.

std::string foo("foo");
std::string foobar("foobar");

auto res = std::mismatch(foo.begin(), foo.end(), foobar.begin());

if (res.first == foo.end())
{
  // foo is a prefix of foobar.
}
share|improve this answer
2  
+1, and this can actually be extended to test share a prefix rather than is a prefix by comparing the result against begin() rather than end (and can get the actual length of the common prefix too, by substracting) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 27 '11 at 9:43
6  
+1, but This is dangerous if the second string is shorter because you would iterate past its end. it is therefore needed to check that foo.size() <= foobar.size(). –  Benoit Oct 27 '11 at 12:53
    
@Benoit, yip; the thing that bemuses me is that they could have so easily accepted an end for the second iterator and save us having to do the check before... –  Nim Oct 27 '11 at 13:04
    
maybe because it sometimes happen that you compare distinct containers, you know that the first one is shorter than the second one for sure, but computing the size or an end iterator in the second container would be time-consuming. –  Benoit Oct 27 '11 at 13:12
1  
This is neat, but James Kanze's solution of using std::equal is simpler. –  histumness Oct 9 '13 at 15:41

With string::compare, you should be able to write something like:

bool match = (0==s1.compare(0, min(s1.length(), s2.length()), s2,0,min(s1.length(),s2.length())));

Alternatively, in case we don't want to use the length() member function:

bool isPrefix(string const& s1, string const&s2)
{
    const char*p = s1.c_str();
    const char*q = s2.c_str();
    while (*p&&*q)
        if (*p++!=*q++)
            return false;
    return true;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is potentially inefficient if string1 is very long - calling length() is O(n) and there's no need to know the exact length of the string. You only care if it's long enough or not. –  Frerich Raabe Oct 27 '11 at 9:21
3  
.length() is O(n) ? Are you by any chance looking at the character_traits table? –  MSalters Oct 27 '11 at 9:27
1  
@Frerich: I admit, I didn't know that. But then again, it's probably O(1) on most current compilers. Alternatively, you could just start at the beginning, and compare chars until one of them is \0. –  Vlad Oct 27 '11 at 9:40
4  
In C++11, length() must take constant time; in C++03, it "should". –  Mike Seymour Oct 27 '11 at 9:52
3  
@FrerichRaabe: Rationale 1) string needs to know begin() and end() in constant time, the iterators are random, so they can be substracted in constant time, and the difference is the size of the string, to it must be known in constant time. Rationale 2) unless the string is implemented with ropes (forbidden in C++11, not implemented in any known current standard library implementation), the memory is contiguous, and that means that knowing begin() and end() and knowing size() is equivalent, you need to store two of the three and the other can be calculated in constant time. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 27 '11 at 10:56

If you know which string is shorter, the procedure is simple, just use std::equal with the shorter string first. If you don't, something like the following should work:

bool
unorderIsPrefix( std::string const& lhs, std::string const& rhs )
{
    return std::equal(
        lhs.begin(),
        lhs.begin() + std::min( lhs.size(), rhs.size() ),
        rhs.begin() );
}
share|improve this answer

std::string(X).find(Y) is zero if and only if Y is a prefix of X

share|improve this answer
1  
It's probably not the most efficient. The compiler would need to inline it, or else it must search for Y at non-zero offsets too. –  MSalters Oct 27 '11 at 9:18
3  
This is concise, but potentially inefficient (imagine if X is very long and Y is not the prefix of X). –  Frerich Raabe Oct 27 '11 at 9:19
    
@FrerichRaabe: That's why I commented on this myself. A good optimizer will spot the comparison with zero, find that the comparand corresponds to the index variable used in the preceding for loop, and replace the for loop by an if statement. –  MSalters Oct 27 '11 at 13:16

How about simply:

bool prefix(const std::string& a, const std::string& b) {
  if (a.size() > b.size()) {
    return a.substr(0,b.size()) == b;
  }
  else {
    return b.substr(0,a.size()) == a;
  }
}

C++ not C, safe, simple, efficient.

Tested with:

#include <string>
#include <iostream>

bool prefix(const std::string& a, const std::string& b);

int main() {
  const std::string t1 = "test";
  const std::string t2 = "testing";
  const std::string t3 = "hello";
  const std::string t4 = "hello world";
  std::cout << prefix(t1,t2) << "," << prefix(t2,t1) << std::endl;
  std::cout << prefix(t3,t4) << "," << prefix(t4,t3) << std::endl;
  std::cout << prefix(t1,t4) << "," << prefix(t4,t1) << std::endl;
  std::cout << prefix(t1,t3) << "," << prefix(t3,t1) << std::endl;

}
share|improve this answer
    
Why the downvote? –  Flexo Oct 27 '11 at 12:48
    
Why std::for_each + lambda, instead of the much less noisy ranged for loop? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Oct 27 '11 at 12:49
    
@R.MartinhoFernandes - removed. I only added that bit to show calling it with a bigger list. –  Flexo Oct 27 '11 at 12:54

If you can reasonably ignore any multi-byte encodings (say, UTF-8) then you can use strncmp for this:

// Yields true if the string 's' starts with the string 't'.
bool startsWith( const std::string &s, const std::string &t )
{
    return strncmp( s.c_str(), t.c_str(), t.size() ) == 0;
}

If you insist on using a fancy C++ version, you can use the std::equal algorithm (with the added benefit that your function also works for other collections, not just strings):

// Yields true if the string 's' starts with the string 't'.
template <class T>
bool startsWith( const T &s, const T &t )
{
    return s.size() >= t.size() &&
           std::equal( t.begin(), t.end(), s.begin() );
}
share|improve this answer
    
With your std::equal solution, what happens when s is shorter than t? It appears that it could read past the end of s. –  teambob Oct 18 '12 at 0:40
    
@teambob: You're right; I augmented the answer to check the sizes of the two strings. –  Frerich Raabe Oct 18 '12 at 7:37

Easiest way is to use substr() and compare() member functions:

string str = "Foobar";
string prefix = "Foo";

if(str.substr(0, prefix.size()).compare(prefix) == 0) cout<<"Found!";
share|improve this answer
    
The substr operation typically makes a copy of the data, so this isn't as efficient as it could be. –  Neil Mayhew Feb 26 '14 at 21:34
1  
if you are going to use substr() you can simply write str.substr(0, prefix.size()) == prefix –  ony Jan 28 at 18:36

str1.find(str2) returns 0 if entire str2 is found at the index 0 of str1:

#include <string>
#include <iostream>

// does str1 have str2 as prefix?
bool StartsWith(const std::string& str1, const std::string& str2)
{   
    return (str1.find(str2)) ? false : true;
}

// is one of the strings prefix of the another?
bool IsOnePrefixOfAnother(const std::string& str1, const std::string& str2)
{   
    return (str1.find(str2) && str2.find(str1)) ? false : true;
}

int main()
{
    std::string str1("String");
    std::string str2("String:");
    std::string str3("OtherString");

    if(StartsWith(str2, str1))
    {
        std::cout << "str2 starts with str1" << std::endl;      
    }
    else
    {
        std::cout << "str2 does not start with str1" << std::endl;
    }

    if(StartsWith(str3, str1))
    {
        std::cout << "str3 starts with str1" << std::endl;      
    }
    else
    {
        std::cout << "str3 does not start with str1" << std::endl;
    }

        if(IsOnePrefixOfAnother(str2, str1))
        {
            std::cout << "one is prefix of another" << std::endl;      
        }
        else
        {
            std::cout << "one is not prefix of another" << std::endl;
        }

        if(IsOnePrefixOfAnother(str3, str1))
        {
            std::cout << "one is prefix of another" << std::endl;      
        }
        else
        {
            std::cout << "one is not prefix of another" << std::endl;
        }

    return 0;
}

Output:

  str2 starts with str1
  str3 does not start with str1
  one is prefix of another
  one is not prefix of another
share|improve this answer

What's wrong with the "find" and checking the result for position 0 ?

string a = "String";
string b = "String:";

if(b.find(a) == 0)
{
// Prefix

}
else
{
// No Prefix
}
share|improve this answer

I think strncmp is the closest to what you're looking for.

Though, if reworded, you may be looking for strstr(s2,s1)==s2, which is not necessarily the most performant way to do that. But you do not want to work out n ;-)

Okay, okay, the c++ version would be !s1.find(s2).

Okay, you can make it even more c++, something like this: std::mismatch(s1.begin(),s1.end(),s2.begin()).first==s1.end().

share|improve this answer
3  
The question is tagged as C++, not C. –  Paul R Oct 27 '11 at 9:20
    
.c_str() is not that hard to call :) –  Michael Krelin - hacker Oct 27 '11 at 9:21

This is both efficient and convenient:

a.size() >= b.size() && a.compare(0, b.size(), b) == 0

With std::string, the size operation is zero-cost, and compare uses the fast traits::compare method.

Note that without the size comparison, compare alone is not enough because it compares only a.size() characters and "xyz" would be a prefix of "xy".

share|improve this answer
    
Why you need a.size() >= b.size()? compare() will handle that as well. –  ony Jan 28 at 18:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.