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There isn't much documentation about Play 2.0 template engine.

How does one create a tag using Scala template?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 20 down vote accepted

The template engine in play 2.0 is directly coming from the play 1.0 scala module. If you are still wondering what benefits does a functional language such as Scala brings to the picture, well this is certainly one of the areas where it shines.

Demonstration:

In scala syntax a tag is nothing else than a function call. what's interesting, is that html fragments are considered as functions themselves, allowing the most powerful substitution constructs.

Let's define an html page called mytag.scala.html

file:apps/views/mytags/mytag.scala.html

@(level:String = "error", index: Int)(body: (String) => Html)

@level match {

    case "success" => {
        <p class="success" index="@index">
            @body("green")
        </p>
    }

    case "warning" => {
        <p class="warning" index="@index">
            @body("orange")
        </p>
    }

    case "error" => {
        <p class="error" index="@index">
            @body("red")
        </p>
    }    
}

The tag above takes 3 parameters in 2 distinct parameter groups:

  1. A level, represented by a string ( which defaults to "error")
  2. An index
  3. Finally a function called body, that takes a string parameter and returns HTML code. Note that body is defined in its own parameter group. it is equivalent to what we know in j2ee as a jsp fragment.

Now let's see how we can use this tag:

@import views.mytags._

@mytag("error",2) { color =>
    Oops, something is <span style="color:@color">wrong</span>
}

Before we can use a tag (or function), we need to let Play know where it is located: that's the purpose of the import statement. Note that the location (the path) of the tag file is irrelevant as long as you adjust the import location, just like with Java packages.

Follows the call itself which is kind of straightforward. Note however that we are passing a parametrized html fragment to the tag.

For further details, you may find the scala template documentation at this URL

Play 2.0 will eventually come with its own documentation.

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Completely unnecessary answer but just to train my scala. Wouldn't this work and be shorter while staying clear?

@(level:String = "error", index: Int)(body: (String) => Html)

<p class="@level" index="@index">
    @body(
       @level match {
         case "success" => "green"
         case "warning" => "orange"
         case "error" => "red"
       }
    )
</p>
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I honestly don't know, not a scala expert yet. looks like a good question on SO. –  Olivier Refalo Oct 29 '11 at 12:32
    
I should retry play2.0 soon. Last time, it was really really too raw for my experiments! I'm not a Scala expert yet but I learn a lot and it's the only language till now that gives me the impression I could definitely switch off Java at the end ;) –  mandubian Nov 2 '11 at 8:19
    
In this case, if level is anything other than success, warning or error, you will have a p tag with that css class, which might not be indended. In the answer from @Olivier Refalo, a P tag only will be printed if it matches one of the error levels. –  user3001 Apr 6 '12 at 12:07
    
actually if it's not one of those 3 values, it's a MatchError - as written this tag insists on a valid 'level' passed in - your approach is better. –  Adam Rabung May 10 '12 at 12:45

i get a compiler error, when I used the first example. Delete the "views." in the import solved the problem

use @import mytags._

Full example (http://www.playframework.com/documentation/2.1.1/JavaTemplateUseCases):

Let’s write a simple views/tags/notice.scala.html 
tag that displays an HTML notice:

@(level: String = "error")(body: (String) => Html)

@level match {

  case "success" => {
    <p class="success">
      @body("green")
    </p>
  }

  case "warning" => {
    <p class="warning">
      @body("orange")
    </p>
  }

  case "error" => {
    <p class="error">
      @body("red")
    </p>
  }

}

And now let’s use it from another template:

@import tags._
@notice("error") { color => Oops, something is wrong }

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