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There is a coffee shop that sells beverage. each cup of beverage sold would be assigned an unique ID.

Assume all customers of the coffee shop has shop's member IDs(all of them are unique).

Beverage of the shop can be divided into 2 types: either Coffee or Tea.

Now I got 4 tables.

  • Member(memberID, memberName)

  • Beverage(bID, customerID) (customerID referencing Member.memberID)<--have one beverage entity for each cup sold.

  • Coffee(coffeeName, bID) (bID referencing Beverage.bID)

  • Tea(teaName, bID) (bID referencing Beverage.bID)

Tea and Coffee are subtypes of beverage.

Also Each member can buy different beverages many times.

Find the SQL query that can display all members who have bought both kinds of beverages (i.e. don't count member who only buys one kind of beverage).

I have thought about this question for about half a day...hope someone can help me.

share|improve this question
2  
What did you try so far? – Ocaso Protal Oct 27 '11 at 11:37
2  
If you have any influence over the structure of the database, I would strongly recommend merging the Coffee and Tea tables. – Mark Bannister Oct 27 '11 at 11:56
select
  memberID
from
  Member
where
  memberID IN (select customerID
                 from Beverage inner join Coffee on Beverage.bID = Coffee.bID)
AND
  memberID IN (select customerID
                 from Beverage inner join Tea on Beverage.bID = Tea.bID)

or using EXISTS

select
  memberID
from
  Member
where
  exists (select *
            from Beverage inner join Coffee on Beverage.bID = Coffee.bID
           where Beverage.customerID = Member.memberID)
AND
  exists (select *
            from Beverage inner join Tea on Beverage.bID = Tea.bID
           where Beverage.customerID = Member.memberID)

Depending on the dataset the EXISTS variant may be faster. Assuming the necessary indexes are present this will allow the optimizer to shortcut when evaluating the exists checks.

share|improve this answer
1  
Why go to the bother and expense of subqueries when a straightforward inner join will do the same job more efficiently? – StevieG Oct 27 '11 at 11:51
1  
@StevieG: In some databases, a where exists clause ensures that the query only checks for the first occurrence of a matching record, whereas a join clause will match all matching records. Under such circumstances, an exists clause may be much faster. – Mark Bannister Oct 27 '11 at 12:00
1  
@StevieG. I did it with a subquery because the join solution won't work (see my comment on your answer). You could do it with joins by joining the beverage table in twice but I am presuming this table will be very large and wanted to avoid cross joining a very large table. – njr101 Oct 27 '11 at 13:12

You can just inner join to both tables, any member who didn't buy both types will be excluded by the join..

select
  distinct m.memberID
from
  Member m 
  INNER JOIN Beverage b ON  m.memberID = b.customerID
  INNER JOIN Beverage b1 ON m.memberID = b1.customerID
  INNER JOIN Coffee c ON b.bID = c.bID
  INNER JOIN Tea t ON b1.bID = t.bID
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for the DISTINCT – bw_üezi Oct 27 '11 at 11:52
1  
This won't work. The join to beverage is looking for a tea transaction and a coffee transaction in the same record (effectively b.bid = c.bid = t.bid). This can never be fulfilled (unless there are tea and coffee drinks with the same bid which would lead to all sorts of other problems) – njr101 Oct 27 '11 at 13:11
    
Good point, answer updated.. – StevieG Oct 27 '11 at 15:05
SELECT DISTINCT m.memberName
FROM Member m
  INNER JOIN (
    SELECT b1.customerID 
    FROM Beverage b1
      INNER JOIN Coffee c ON b1.bID = c.bID
  ) bc ON m.memberID = bc.customerID
  INNER JOIN (
    SELECT b2.customerID 
    FROM Beverage b2
      INNER JOIN Tea t ON b2.bID = t.bID
  ) bt ON m.memberID = bt.customerID
share|improve this answer
2  
This won't work. The join to beverage is looking for a tea transaction and a coffee transaction in the same record (effectively b.bid = c.bid = t.bid). This can never be fulfilled (unless there are tea and coffee drinks with the same bid which would lead to all sorts of other problems) – njr101 Oct 27 '11 at 13:13
    
@njreed.myopenid.com you're right. just tried now to find yet another solution. P.S. You're solution with the EXISTS is very clever. – bw_üezi Oct 28 '11 at 7:55
Select Distinct m.MemberName,m.MemerID from Member m 
where m.MemerID In
    (Select     b1.CustomerID
    FROM Beverage b1 InnerJoin Coffee c On b1.bID=c.bID
    where b1.CustomerID In
        (Select b2.CustomerID
        From Beverage b2 InnerJoin Tea t On b2.bID=t.Bid))
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