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I have a web that was build using ASP.NET MVC 1.0. It uses Structuremap as an IOC container. The IOC part works nice if I register it on Application_Start like this:

ObjectFactory.Initialize(service =>
    {
        service.ForRequestedType<IOrderRepository>()
               .TheDefaultIsConcreteType<OrderRepository>()
               .CacheBy(InstanceScope.PerRequest);
    });

I have to use the same backend in a Windows Service.

The service has some timers in it that access OrderRepository simultaneously, so threading is an issue here.

My first idea is to register it in the constructor of the service like this:

public Service1()
{
    ObjectFactory.Initialize(service =>
        {
            service.ForRequestedType<IOrderRepository>()
                   .TheDefaultIsConcreteType<OrderRepository>()
                   .CacheBy(InstanceScope.PerRequest);
        });
}

Is this the right place and the right parameter for caching?

Reading the documentation of Structuremap, I think the safest way is to use the default setting for Caching:

PerRequest - The default operation. A new instance will be created for each request.

I had the impression that PerRequest meant HttpContext, but thats another entry:

HttpContext - A single instance will be created for each HttpContext. Caches the instances in the HttpContext.Items collection.

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I think you would typically do stuff like this in the OnStart wouldn't you? I guess that could be called multiple times on a single instance though, which is undesirable. –  Paul Tyng Nov 9 '11 at 1:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+200

Per this article: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.serviceprocess.servicebase.aspx

The executable calls the ServiceBase derived class's constructor the first time you call Start on the service. The OnStart command-handling method is called immediately after the constructor executes. The constructor is not executed again after the first time the service has been loaded, so it is necessary to separate the processing performed by the constructor from that performed by OnStart. Any resources that can be released by OnStop should be created in OnStart. Creating resources in the constructor prevents them from being created properly if the service is started again after OnStop has released the resources.

It sounds like constructor is the way to go for the first time setup of structure map.

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The distinction between loading and starting a service is new to me! Its hard to belive that if you stop and start a service the constructor is not called again: But if thats what the documentation says I guess thats how it is. Good point! –  Malcolm Frexner Nov 9 '11 at 9:31

To be honest this is more of a "my two cents" contribution that actually trying to give a definitive answer since it's been a while since I developed a Windows Service but here it goes.

Making an analogy from an ASP .Net MVC app in which the configuration of the container would take place in the Global.asax class' Application_Start method and then inject the configured container into a custom Controller Factory; I believe you could, instead of configuring everything in the service's constructor, try to do it in the Main function of the executable, since it will only run once, and then inject the configured container in the constructor of the service.

I think that by doing it that way you are bootstrapping everything Composition Root of the application and the code within the service will focus on doing what it is supposed to do.

Like I said it's been a while and I never did it with an IoC container or DI for that matter. Best of lucks!

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