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I have the following code:

#define MAX_NUMBER_OF_FRAMES 10

typedef struct my_frame_header {
    unsigned int ul_Src;
    unsigned int ul_Dest;
} MY_FRAME_HEADER;

typedef struct my_frame {
    MY_FRAME_HEADER x_FrameHeader;
    unsigned char  uc_Frame[3000];
} MY_FRAME;

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    MY_FRAME *px_MyFrames;
    px_MyFrames = (MY_FRAME *)malloc(sizeof(MY_FRAME) * MAX_NUMBER_OF_FRAMES);

    // Use the x_MyFrames variable like an array
    px_MyFrames[0].uc_Frame[0] = 10;

    //free px_MyFrames
    free(px_MyFrames);

    return 1;
}

Will all the memory be succesfully freed? or do I need to make uc_Frame a pointer and malloc memory in an Init function of MY_FRAME? And then in the destructor free the memory for each uc_Frame of px_MyFrames and then free px_MyFrames? (Sorry if there are any compiler errors, I just wrote on the fly to give you the basic idea). If the way I put it here is not the right one and there are memory problems could you explain what those problems might be?.

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Welcome to StackOverflow, I hope you read the FAQ. –  Christian Rau Oct 27 '11 at 12:58
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5 Answers

Since uc_Frame is an array and not a pointer, this perfectly works. As it's an array, the data will just be stored directly in the struct, which in turn will have a size of approximately 3008 bytes. So there is no need to malloc any data for uc_Frame, because again it's an array and not just a pointer.

Would it have been something like:

typedef struct my_frame {
    MY_FRAME_HEADER x_FrameHeader;
    unsigned int   ul_FrameSize;
    unsigned char *uc_Frame;
} MY_FRAME;

Then you would have to allocate (and free, of course) the data for uc_Frame dynamically, as it's just a pointer and not an array. And it would not be stored in the struct, which in turn would have a size of only about 16 or 24 byte.

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Thanks, I just wasn't sure about the Array being handled correctly or not. But as you and the others have mentioned it works perfectly good without the need of a pointer and another malloc/free. –  J. C. Oct 27 '11 at 13:02
    
@J.C. In case this (or any other) answer was the correct answer to your question, accepting and up-voting is the correct response. If you don't know what I'm talking about and how this Q&A site works, take a look into the FAQ. –  Christian Rau Nov 21 '11 at 16:41
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Yes, the memory will be freed by calling free.

Check this out:

#include <stdio.h>

typedef struct my_frame_header {
    unsigned int ul_Src;
    unsigned int ul_Dest;
} MY_FRAME_HEADER;

typedef struct my_frame {
    MY_FRAME_HEADER x_FrameHeader;
    unsigned char  uc_Frame[3000];
} MY_FRAME;

int main()
{
    printf("%d\n", sizeof(MY_FRAME));
}

When run, it prints 3008.

That means when you call malloc, it's actually allocating 3008 bytes of space for each instance of MY_FRAME in px_MyFrames. This is enough space to hold uc_Frame and x_FrameHeader. Therefore, you don't need to allocate uc_Frame yourself. malloc remembers that it has allocated 3008 bytes of space so that when you free it, everything gets deallocated.

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It would be successfully freed. The memory space you allocated has a size of sizeof(MY_FRAME), and sizeof(MY_FRAME) here contains the size of your array and it would be sizeof(MY_FRAME_HEADER) + sizeof(unsigned char) * 3000. So when freeing it, the memory range [px_MyFrames, px_MyFrames + sizeof(MY_FRAME)) would be freed.

Also, another common method is to hold a pointer of an array in the struct like this:

typedef struct my_frame {
    MY_FRAME_HEADER x_FrameHeader;
    unsigned char  *uc_Frame;
} MY_FRAME;

And this time the initialization and finalization would be:

/* initialization */
px_MyFrames = (MY_FRAME *)malloc(sizeof(MY_FRAME) * MAX_NUMBER_OF_FRAMES);
/* and the following line matters */
px_MyFrames->uf_Frame = malloc(sizeof(ungisned char) * 3000);

/* when in finalization */
free(px_MyFrames->uf_Frame);
free(px_MyFrames);

By the way, a C program shall give a return value of 0 on its normal returning.

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Yeah sorry it was just a fast written example, but you're right, it should return 0. –  J. C. Oct 27 '11 at 13:04
    
yeah that's what I meant with the 2nd option only that I would need a for loop to malloc memory for every uc_Frame, not just the first like yours, if I were to use all of the MAX_NUMBER_OF_FRAMES. And the same for freeing every uc_Frame. –  J. C. Oct 27 '11 at 13:08
    
@J.C. Personally I don't prefer either form of the declaration of struct, though both are okay. It depends on the specific data to store and the usage. –  starrify Oct 27 '11 at 13:12
    
@Pangyu CHEN How would you declare them? I have a frame (Ethernet, Fibre Channel, etc) which has a Header part with some information about the destination, source, length, protocol, etc. Then I have the actual payload data, which could be anything up to 3000 bytes. As I see it is the most simple form I can have but if there is a better way I'd like to know to learn it for future projects. –  J. C. Oct 27 '11 at 13:19
    
@J.C. It'll look just the same as what I wrote in the answer above, in which the struct holds a pointer to a dynamically allocated memory region. I'm using this style to implement resize-able arrays to simulate std::vector<> in c++ in some project. –  starrify Oct 27 '11 at 14:43
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Don't care about uc_Frame attribute. You are really allocating memory for MAX_NUMBER_OF_FRAMES * sizeof(MY_FRAME) correctly and you are using and freeing it ok.

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Yes, all of the memory will be freed. The region returned by malloc will be big enough to store the entire contents of 10 struct my_frames. When you call free it will release the entire region.

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