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I am not sure if this is possible and I may need to write extension methods for each implementation. Here is some example code:

public interface IBaseService<T>
{
    IUnitOfwork UnitOfWork {get;}
}

public interface IService<T>: IBaseService<T>
{
    IEnumerable<T> GetAll();
    T GetById(Guid id);
}

public interface IUserService: IService<User>
{
     User FindByUsernameAndPassword(string username, string password)
}

public class BaseService<T>: IService<T>
{

     public BaseService(IRepository<T> repository)
     {
        _repository = repository
     }
     public virtual IEnumerable<T> GetAll(){....};
     public virtual T GetById(Guid id){....};
     IUnitOfWork UnitOfWork {get {return _repository.UnitOfWork;}}
}

public class UserService: BaseService<User>, IUserService
{
   ...
}

public static class ServiceExtensions
{
     public static IBaseService<T> EnableLazyLoading<T>(this IBaseService<T> service, bool lazyLoad = True)
     {
          service.UnitOfWork.EnableLazyLoad(lazyLoad);
          return service;
     }
}

So, let's say I am using the UserService. When I call the extension method on the UserService, is it possible to have it return the proper implementation of IBaseService or do I need to create and Extension Method for each implementation?:

Example:

userService.EnableLazyLoading(false).FindByUsernameAndPassword("ddivita","123456")
share|improve this question
    
So, to clarify, are you saying you want it to create a new version of whatever it's called from? – James Michael Hare Oct 27 '11 at 13:59
    
I'd like only to write one extension method to be used by all implementations of IBaseServcie<T> that would return the correct implementation of it. In my example I'd like to figure out a way to return the IUserService when I call the EnableLazyLoading extension. – DDiVita Oct 27 '11 at 14:02
    
Oh! I see, so you want it to return the specific type it was called in, not create a new instance of it. – James Michael Hare Oct 27 '11 at 14:06
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can do it this way:

public static S EnableLazyLoading<T, S>(this S service, bool lazyLoad = true)
     where S : IBaseService<T>
{
     service.UnitOfWork.EnableLazyLoad(lazyLoad);
     return service;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I came up with the same answer, only problem is it can't infer the type (which may or may not be okay with the OP), so you'd have to explicitly call it like: userService.EnableLazyLoading<UserService, User>(false)... – James Michael Hare Oct 27 '11 at 14:10
    
Yes, that's true, but i would prefer this way over creating a extension method n times. The only thing you could do, if you have multiple extension methods, is to change from a interface to a abstract class. – Felix K. Oct 27 '11 at 14:13
    
Oh I totally agree. Just pointing out the downside. – James Michael Hare Oct 27 '11 at 14:15
    
Sad thing is, if we could assume the T (i.e. in his example assume the User) then inference could kick in... – James Michael Hare Oct 27 '11 at 14:18

Okay, this may or may not work with your design, but it builds on Felix's answer (which he should get the credit for) and makes it infer-able.

Because your UnitOfWork class does not depend on type T, you can create an IBaseService that is non generic that contains the UnitOfWork member, then make IBaseService<T> extend IBaseService like so:

public interface IBaseService
{
    // all non-type-T related stuff
    IUnitOfwork UnitOfWork {get;}
}

public interface IBaseService<T> : IBaseService
{
    // .. all type T releated stuff
}

Then, keep rest of your class design as normal and write the extension method as:

public static S EnableLazyLoading<S>(this S service, bool lazyLoad = true)
     where S : IBaseService
{
     service.UnitOfWork.EnableLazyLoad(lazyLoad);
     return service;
}

Since we don't need the IBaseService<T> to get UnitOfWork now, we don't need to specify the second type parameter T which was making inference problematic. So now we can write the code exactly as you wanted because it can now infer S is UserService without needing to know about the type T (User):

userService.EnableLazyLoading(false).FindByUsernameAndPassword("ddivita","123456");

Of course, this is assuming, as I said, that UnitOfWork doesn't need anything from type T.

As I said, @Felix deserves the answer, but just wanted to expand on how could make it infer-able to avoid having to pass in the generic type parameter. Up-votes are appreciated though :-)

share|improve this answer
    
Oh that is brilliant! – DDiVita Oct 27 '11 at 14:40
    
@DDiVita: Thanks, though like I said Felix deserves the answer, I was just building on his work. – James Michael Hare Oct 27 '11 at 14:43
1  
This worked great, btw. My UoW is not typed, so it was a perfect solution. Thanks to you and Felix – DDiVita Oct 27 '11 at 15:47

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