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I'm having difficulty understanding why this code, an attempt to use the new <random> header in C++11, is correctly generating random numbers in [0, 2**62 - 1] but not [0, 2**63 - 1] or [0, 2**64 - 1].

#include <iostream>
#include <stdint.h>
#include <random>
#include <functional>
#include <ctime>

static std::mt19937 engine; // Mersenne twister MT19937

void print_n_random_bits (unsigned int n);

int main (void) {
  engine.seed(time(0));
  print_n_random_bits(64);
  print_n_random_bits(63);
  print_n_random_bits(62);
  return 0;
}

void print_n_random_bits (unsigned int n)
{
  uintmax_t max;

  if (n == 8 * sizeof(uintmax_t)) {
    max = 0;
  } else {
    max = 1;
    max <<= n;
  }
  --max;

  std::uniform_int_distribution<uintmax_t> distribution(0, max);

  std::cout << n << " bits, max: " << max << std::endl;
  std::cout << distribution(engine) << std::endl;
}

Now, a bit more digging reveals std::mt19937_64, which has the correct behaviour, but can anyone explain to me why something that works for a 62 bit number doesn't work for a 64 bit one?

Edit: Sorry, I didn't even specify the problem. The problem is that for 63 and 64 bit max values, the output is consistently a number in the range [0, 2**32 - 1], e.g.:

% ./rand                       
64 bits, max: 18446744073709551615
1803260654
63 bits, max: 9223372036854775807
3178301365
62 bits, max: 4611686018427387903
2943926730538475327

% ./rand                                
64 bits, max: 18446744073709551615
1525658116
63 bits, max: 9223372036854775807
2093351390
62 bits, max: 4611686018427387903
1513326512211312260

% ./rand                                                       
64 bits, max: 18446744073709551615
884934896
63 bits, max: 9223372036854775807
683284805
62 bits, max: 4611686018427387903
2333288494897435595       

Edit 2: I'm using clang++ (Apple clang version 2.1 (tags/Apple/clang-163.7.1)) and "libc++". I can't easily test the above with GCC as my version doesn't have c++0x support.

share|improve this question
    
What exactly is it doing that's unexpected? That is, how exactly is it presenting you with results that differ from your expectations? –  andand Oct 27 '11 at 14:53
    
Also, what standard library implementation are you using? –  Fanael Oct 27 '11 at 14:56
4  
Consider its maybe just bad luck :) –  Dani Oct 27 '11 at 14:59
    
With GCC4.5.1, all three tests (62/63/64 bits) return 32-bit values. ideone.com/3GZ9S –  interjay Oct 27 '11 at 15:44
    
With GCC4.6.1, all three tests (62/63/64 bits) return 64-bit values. –  Mike Seymour Oct 27 '11 at 16:02
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2 Answers

up vote 18 down vote accepted

You've found a bug in libc++. Thanks!!!

I have committed the following fix to tip-of-trunk revision 143104:

Index: include/algorithm
===================================================================
--- include/algorithm   (revision 143102)
+++ include/algorithm   (working copy)
@@ -2548,7 +2548,7 @@
         {
             __u = __e_() - _Engine::min();
         } while (__u >= __y0_);
-        if (__w0_ < _EDt)
+        if (__w0_ < _WDt)
             _S <<= __w0_;
         else
             _S = 0;
@@ -2561,7 +2561,7 @@
         {
             __u = __e_() - _Engine::min();
         } while (__u >= __y1_);
-        if (__w0_ < _EDt - 1)
+        if (__w0_ < _WDt - 1)
             _S <<= __w0_ + 1;
         else
             _S = 0;

This fix does not require a recompile of the binary libc++.dylib.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow, fast work! Thanks Howard. –  Nick Oct 27 '11 at 16:31
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Since std::mt19937 is the 32-bit version, most likely what's happening is it's making assumptions about which bits do and do not matter in its "work space" when generating the next number. This then results in overflow when generating numbers that could including those last two bits. I suspect that you'd find the actual distribution is not really uniform with max numbers higher than 2**32 - 1 on the 32 bit engine.

share|improve this answer
    
Not sure about this. Brief investigations suggest that the distribution is uniform or as-near-as-damnit with max of 2**62 - 1, based on 1,000,000 generated integers. –  Nick Oct 27 '11 at 15:25
1  
Even if mt19937 returns 32-bit numbers, shouldn't uniform_int_distribution call it multiple times to create 62/63/64-bit numbers? –  interjay Oct 27 '11 at 15:34
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