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public function create():ArrayCollection{

            var index:int = 0;
            var data:ArrayCollection = new ArrayCollection();
            var length:int = originalData.length;

            for(index; index < length; index++){
                data.addItem(originalData[index]);
            } 

            return data;
        }
  • originalData is the original state of my data from database.
  • data is a copy of originalData used to be manipulated as the provider for my List component.
  • There's a button I use to call the create() function above, that would mean, I want to revert all changes in data, and go back to everything I have in originalData.

But when I debug my function, originalData has all the changes made in data.

When I use

list.selectedItem.thing = "new string";

is supposed to modify data[index].thing, because data is my List.dataprovider. but it changes originalData[index].thing also and this collection wasn't used for anything, except for creating a copy of itself!

I don't know why this happens. I didn't know how to phrase this behaviour as a google query.

Please, if you don't understand the question, comment it so I can try and make it clearer. This has consumed more time than its functionality is worth.

EDIT:

I've also tried this, but it doesn't work:

public function create():ArrayCollection{

            var index:int = 0;
            var data:ArrayCollection = new ArrayCollection();
            var length:int = originalData.length;

            for(index; index < length; index++){
// initializing a Item object.
                var dataItem:Item = new Item();
                dataItem = originalData[index] as Item;
                data.addItem(dataItem);
            } 

            return data;
        }

EDIT 2:

Based on your answers and some research I came up with this generic function to copy arrayCollections made of custom objects.

public static function copy(objectClassName:String, objectClass:Class, arrayCollection:ArrayCollection):ArrayCollection{
            var index:int = 0;
            var length:int = arrayCollection.length;
            var copy:ArrayCollection = new ArrayCollection();

            for(index; index < length; index++){
                registerClassAlias(objectClassName,objectClass);
                copy.addItemAt(ObjectUtil.copy(arrayCollection.getItemAt(index)) as objectClass,index);
            }
            return copy;
        }
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As Tom says, this is because AS3 passes by reference. If you don't want to modify the original values then you should, again as Tom says, create copies of them.

Fortunately, AS3 has a utility to do this -- ObjectUtils.copy. Try this code instead of your original:

public function create():ArrayCollection{

            var index:int = 0;
            var data:ArrayCollection = new ArrayCollection();
            var length:int = originalData.length;

            for(index; index < length; index++){
                data.addItem(mx.utils.ObjectUtil.copy(originalData[index]));
            } 

            return data;
        }

Do take note that copy() returns a generic Object. If you want to access any of its properties in a type-safe manner you'll have to cast it to its type.

A bit more about the pass-by-reference deal. Let's say we have items a, b, and c floating around in memory. You put them into an array(originalData). originalData now contains references to a, b, and c. You then create an ArrayCollection and insert (again) references to a, b, c. Objects a, b, and c aren't what's being stored in either the array or the ArrayCollection. So when you update originalData[0] you're getting a reference to an object (a), and updating it.

Likewise when you update ArrayCollection.getItemAt(0) you're getting the same reference and updating the underlying object which is why you're getting the behavior you're getting. Making a copy and inserting it means you're referencing an entirely new object.

share|improve this answer
    
By casting you refer to this? ObjectUtil.copy(originalData[index]) as MyItem –  Karl Goblecoque Oct 27 '11 at 15:46
    
Yes, that's what I mean. –  sean Oct 27 '11 at 15:47
    
Thank you, sean. –  Karl Goblecoque Oct 27 '11 at 17:15
    
Hey sean, could you review my code in the latest edit, in my question. –  Karl Goblecoque Oct 27 '11 at 20:24

You need to do a registerClassAlias call for each of the classes inside of your collection, then just use the function clone with the ByteArray suggested above and it will work fine. The key is to do a registerClassAlias call for each type inside of the ArrayCollection which you want to maintain. In my case:

var productGroupClassName:String = getQualifiedClassName(ProductGroup);
                registerClassAlias( productGroupClassName, ProductGroup );
                var productClassName:String = getQualifiedClassName(Product);
                registerClassAlias( productClassName, Product );
                //Need to create a copy so the original values will not be altered
                dataProvider = copyTypeSafe(EnalityData.productsInfo);
share|improve this answer

To create a deep copy of an array and keep the type, use the following method:

public static function clone(source:Object):* 
{ 
    var myBA:ByteArray = new ByteArray(); 
    myBA.writeObject(source); 
    myBA.position = 0; 

    return(myBA.readObject()); 
}

This is the way proposed by Adobe.

Update: idea for a type safe copy function

public static function copyTypeSafe( ac:ArrayCollection ):ArrayCollection
{
    var cloneAc:ArrayCollection = new ArrayCollection();

    if( ac.length ==  0 ) {
        return cloneAc;
    }

    var className:String = getQualifiedClassName( ac.getItemAt(0) );
    registerClassAlias( className, (getDefinitionByName( className ) as Class ) );

    for each (var obj:Object in ac) 
    {
        cloneAc.addItem( ObjectUtil.copy( obj ) );
    }

    return cloneAc;

}
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I used that, but that only keeps the type of the arraycollection, the items contained in it are converted into Object types, which are of no use for me. –  Karl Goblecoque Oct 28 '11 at 15:51
    
Ah yes yo are right ... then you have to use the copy method as sean suggests. I edited my answer and added an idea to make the copy function type safe. –  rico leuthold Oct 28 '11 at 16:53

I am not used to actionscript, but it looks to me like you are putting references to objects from one arrayCollection to another arrayCollection. So if you change those objects, this will be reflected in both arrayCollections since they refer to the same objects.

To avoid this you should make copies from the original objects to put in the new arrayCollection.

share|improve this answer
    
I edited my question, check if I see what you mean. –  Karl Goblecoque Oct 27 '11 at 15:34
    
Looks to me like you totally got what I mean; very nice. –  Tom Nov 3 '11 at 16:27

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