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Given A= {1,4,2,9,7,5,8,2}, find the LIS. Show the filled dynamic programming table and how the solution is found.

My book doesnt cover LIS so im a bit lost on how to start. For the DP table, ive done something similar with Longest Common Subsequences. Any help on how to start this would be much appreciated.

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There is a pretty good wikipedia article on this. You might find what you need to get started there. –  nycdan Oct 27 '11 at 15:30

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Already plenty of answers on this topic but here's my walkthrough, I view this site as a repository of answers for future posterity and this is just to provide additional insight when I worked through it myself.

The longest Increasing Subsequence (LIS) problem is to find the length of the longest subsequence of a given sequence such that all elements of the subsequence are sorted in increasing order. For example, length of LIS for

{ 10, 22, 9, 33, 21, 50, 41, 60, 80 } is 6 and LIS is {10, 22, 33, 50, 60, 80}.

Let S[pos] be defined as the smallest integer that ends an increasing sequence of length pos.

Now iterate through every integer X of the input set and do the following:

If X > last element in S, then append X to the end of S. This essentialy means we have found a new largest LIS.

Otherwise find the smallest element in S, which is >= than X, and change it to X. Because S is sorted at any time, the element can be found using binary search in log(N).

Total runtime - N integers and a binary search for each of them - N * log(N) = O(N log N)

Now let's do a real example:

Set of integers: 2 6 3 4 1 2 9 5 8

Steps:

0. S = {} - Initialize S to the empty set
1. S = {2} - New largest LIS
2. S = {2, 6} - 6 > 2 so append that to S
3. S = {2, 3} - 6 is the smallest element > 3 so replace 6 with 3
4. S = {2, 3, 4} - 4 > 3 so append that to s
5. S = {1, 3, 4} - 2 is the smallest element > 1 so replace 2 with 1
6. S = {1, 2, 4} - 3 is the smallest element > 2 so replace 3 with 2
7. S = {1, 2, 4, 9} - 9 > 4 so append that to S
8. S = {1, 2, 4, 5} - 9 is the smallest element > 5 replace 9 with 5
9. S = {1, 2, 4, 5, 8} - 8 > 5 so append that to S
So the length of the LIS is 5 (the size of S).

Let's take some other sequences to see that this will cover all possible caveats, each presents its own issue

say we have 1,2,3,4,9,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,10

basically it builds out 12349 first, then 2 will replace 3, 3 will replace 4, 4 will replace 9, then append 5,6,7,8,10 so will look like 1,2,2,3,4,6,7,8,10

take the other case we have 1,2,3,4,5,9,2,10 this will give us 1,2,2,4,5,9,10

or take the case we have 1,2,3,4,5,9,6,7,8,10 this will give us 1,2,3,4,5,7,8,10

so that kind of illuminates what goes on, in the first case the critical juncture being what happens when you hit the 2 after the 9, how do you deal with these. well the block of 2,3,4 won't do anything really, when you hit 5 you replace the 9 because the 5 and 9 are virtually indifferentiable 9 ends the block of the first 5 increasing elements, you replace 9 with 5 because 5 is smaller so there is greater potential to hit something > 5 later on. but you only replace the smallest element > itself. for ex. in the last case, if your 6 doesn't replace 9 but instead replaces 1 and 7 replaces 2 and 8 replaces 3, then we get a final array of 7 elements instead of 9. So just do a couple of these and figure out the pattern, this logic isn't the easiest to translate to paper.

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There's a very strong relation between LIS and LCS.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Longest_increasing_subsequence

This article explains it pretty well I think. Basically the idea is, you can reduce one problem to the other (this is the case in many situations involving Dynamic programming).

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