Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm looking for a reliable (and possibly clever) way to share file data across a variable number of threads in Perl. I'm hoping to have a setup where the main thread reads lines from a file while other worker threads to processing on the individual entries.

So far, I've tried using Thread::Queue and haven't had much good luck with them. When I reach the end of the file, most of the threads are stuck in a blocked state waiting to read data from it once the main thread finishes reading. As such, the threads are somewhat stuck in limbo and join() can't reel them back in.

When using non-blocking access for the Queues, the threads have a tendency to get stuck in a tight loop of "try to get data, nope its undefined, try to get data..." which ends up clobbering CPU and doing no work. Each thread usually get at least a few iterations of that tight loop even if there's only one worker thread. Throwing in a sleep() hasn't helped too much because it only takes integer values (sleep(0) is useless and sleep(1) is too slow).

Optimally, I wish it were possible to share the input file's stream and have each thread lock it, read a line from it, then unlock it, but sharing of globs is forbidden/unsupported. I would load the entire file into memory first, but seeing as it has 40 million entries (as a lower-end estimate), it's not terribly feasible.

So this is where y'all come in. I need a handy way to implement a reader/processor setup between the main thread and worker threads that doesn't waste undue CPU waiting for data and leaves the threads in a join()-able state once the reader reaches the end of the file.

Thanks much for any help or ideas!

share|improve this question
    
Use Time::HiRes::sleep for short delays or even (shudder) select undef,undef,undef,$short_delay. –  mob Oct 27 '11 at 15:39
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This little test worked for me. (I had never used threads before, but have done the same thing with fork and pipes in the past). So basically need to tell your threads to finish before asking them to join, for this I stick an undef on the queue.

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use threads;
use Thread::Queue;

use constant MAX_THREADS => 5;

sub process_data
{
    my( $q ) = @_;
    while( defined( my $data = $q->dequeue() ) )
    {
        print "Thread[".threads->tid()."]: Processing data($data)\n";
    }

    print "Thread[".threads->tid()."]: Got end message\n";
} # END process_data

# Main program
{
    my @threads;
    my $q = Thread::Queue->new();
    foreach ( 1 .. MAX_THREAD )
    {
        push( @threads, async { process_data($q) } );
    }

    while( my $line = <STDIN> )
    {
        chop( $line );
        $q->enqueue( $line );
    }

    foreach my $thread ( @threads )
    {
        $q->enqueue( undef );
    }

    foreach my $thread ( @threads )
    {
        $thread->join();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Not bad, I think I'll give this a shot. I was thinking of something similar but didn't think about using undef as a finish flag. –  GigaWatt Oct 27 '11 at 16:05
    
@ikegami editted my answer. What does the async block do? And why is it different/better than what was there before threads->new( "process_data", $q ). Not complaining, just want to learn, this was my first play with threads in perl. –  Sodved Oct 27 '11 at 23:35
    
@Sodved, Starts a new thread. As I specified in the edit message, there are some issues with passing arguments to threads relating to the stack not being refcounted. I can't remember the exact issue, but I always use async to be on the safe side. –  ikegami Oct 28 '11 at 2:24
add comment

Read with the main thread and then use coroutines to process lines:

use strict;
use warnings;
use Coro;

my $sem = Coro::Semaphore->new(10); # maximum of ten semaphores
while my $line ( <$FILE> ) {
    $sem->down;
    async {
        dostuff($line);
        $sem->up;
    };
}
share|improve this answer
    
My only concern with this is that the processing on the line takes longer than the normal line read operation. That means that co-routines will be launched faster than they finish. I'm sure there'll be a balancing point, but I feel like it's leaving it up to chance. I'm probably being too picky though. –  GigaWatt Oct 27 '11 at 15:58
    
Okay, see update for a solution to that. –  Richard Simões Oct 27 '11 at 16:12
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.