Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Reading back some of my Scala code, I noticed that it is either functional or object oriented.

Indeed, I have no idea on how to conciliate the no-side effects rule implied by immutable types and pure functions and the premise of OO, where methods modify instance state in-place, which is obviously side-effects.

One solution I am investigating is to make all methods return a clone of the current instance with the appropriate state modifications. Seems eager, but might help when I'll decide to paralelize the code, right ?

What are the best practices on mixing those 2 paradigms ? What is the balance ?

Thanks.

share|improve this question

closed as not constructive by Luigi Plinge, Will Oct 28 '11 at 14:26

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Interesting and highly related read: Are FP and OO orthogonal? –  delnan Oct 27 '11 at 16:40
4  
Is that the premise of OO? Why, then, does Effective Java recommends immutable objects? I think you should start reconciling your view of OO with what experts have actually been saying... –  Daniel C. Sobral Oct 27 '11 at 19:57

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think I actually take issue with the way you're framing this:

Indeed, I have no idea on how to conciliate the no-side effects rule implied by immutable types and pure functions and the premise of OO, where methods modify instance state in-place, which is obviously side-effects.

I wouldn't say that mutative operations on object fields is a core "premise of OO." Not at all (although conversely I do think that immutability is a core premise of FP). To me, OO is a way of thinking about program modularity more than anything else.

In my (perhaps twisted) mindset, even Haskell -- a language whose advocates often cringe at OO-style thinking -- nevertheless embodies some OO concepts, in the sense that it has a module system, various ways of encapsulating implementation details of datatypes, etc. And on the flip side, although it's exceptionally clumsy and aggravating, my Java code tends to make heavy use of basic functional concepts like currying.

In other words, I think the two approaches are complementary in a sense.

Now, at a less theoretical and more nuts-and-bolts level... Let's say you have something like:

class Foo(val a : A, val b : B, val c : C) {
  def setB(newb : B) : Foo = new Foo(a, newb, c)
}

... so you can say newFoo = foo.setB(b) as you suggested in the original post. I'd say this is totally fine style, and not cause for concern (about performance or readability or anything). You'll see plenty of this with the immutable collection classes in the Scala library.

share|improve this answer
    
If yu say OO is connected to Modularity for you could you describe how that is Accomplished? Which features does OO use to schuss modularity? Im asking because I'm curios and I think to be simple and achieve modularity I can't think of useful (exclusive) OO features which achieve that. Maybe Polymorphism 'a la carte' see here: infoq.com/presentations/Simple-Made-Easy ? –  AndreasScheinert Oct 28 '11 at 8:31

Immutable classes are a very good way to bridge OO and FP. Scala's Collection Library is a great example of blending OO, immutable objects and functional programming.

In your own code, Scala's case classes really help implementing immutable object, since they have a copy method which can be used as a replacement for the builder pattern.

// begin cheesy example
case class Circle(center: (Double, Double), radius: Double) {
  def move(c: (Double, Double)) = copy(center = c)
  def resize(r: Double) = copy(radius = r)
  def area = math.Pi * radius * radius
}

You may also benefit watching Rich Hickey's talks Persistent Data Structures and Managed References, and Are We There Yet? Both do an excellent job explaining the need for immutability, and how it helps us reason about state. He talks about everything with respect to Clojure, but his points apply equally well to Scala.

share|improve this answer

You might wanna check the Functional Programming chapter of Programming Scala (it's available free online) to get some hints.

FP it's not just about threading. High order functions can help you clean up and dry your code, making it look more elegant.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. I am fully convinced of the benefits of FP, and applied them already, but am wondering on the frontier of the duality expressed in the top post. –  Alexandre Mazari Oct 27 '11 at 15:57
    
FP is NOT about about 'making your code look elegant' it is about composability and modularity through reusability. –  AndreasScheinert Oct 28 '11 at 8:21
    
whatever you say –  Pablo Fernandez Oct 28 '11 at 12:13

make all methods return a clone of the current instance

if you check how jQuery does it, it uses a technique called Method Chaining every method that would otherwise return void returns $this, so you can keep calling methods one over another. That's why jQuery objectness doesn't break traditional procedural user code in javascript.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.