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I hwas wondering if, besides using format compact, there is a way to make the display of matrices more compact or tighteer (maybe a third-party package that pre-formats the output of a matrix?)

Here is an example of a matrix displayed in MATLAB with format compact

enter image description here

As you can tell from the image above, there is plenty of white space between columns. The amount of white space between columns is fixed regardless of how many digits are printed overall per row or column.

This white space is wasted if the matrix has more columns than it can represent in a single row for a given width of the command window, since when that happens, MATLAB just breaks up the matrix into several submatrices, making it difficult to read them:

enter image description here

Addendum:

format short helps a bit since it reserves space for only 4 decimals (see the picture below) but is there anything else that makes it even tighter (e.g. something that gives the user control over how many characters are reserved per entry)?

For example, compare this

0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0
0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 
0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1

with:

enter image description here

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1  
You can always overload the disp method of the numerical class you're working with. This might be a bit messy, though. – Jonas Oct 27 '11 at 20:09
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The default spacing, while it probably can be changed by someone who really knows what they're doing, isn't changeable.

If you really need to control how things are displayed, I suggest using the fprintf(1,'...') command. That way you can have as much control over how it looks as possible.

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If you're sure the entries are all integers between 0 and 9 (i.e. one character) then you could use:

fprintf([repmat('%d ',1,size(A,2)) '\n'],A');

which produces something like

1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 
0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 
0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 
0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 
0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 
0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 
0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 

Otherwise for general integers you can get the tightest formatting using:

fprintf([repmat(sprintf('%% %dd',max(floor(log10(abs(A(:)))))+2+any(A(:)<0)),1,size(A,2)) '\n'],A');

which produces something like:

   -111     -3     -2  31061  -2285      2  -2030     -2     -4     34
    579    -31   1166    325 -24273     22    -13     -2     -1    -40
   -150     -2  14166  39317      2     12   5119      9     -7     14
     -4     56   -937  46085   -286     44 -28914    -76  -1477 -26938
  -6661  11121    -63     -4   -275  -2014   4053   -697 -12308   -273
  -2038  -3171  72640   4887    811    252   -114   2214    176     -2
  19837  75428    -21   2038  36152    -11   3782 -33491  11082  -3628
  47025 -42492  73009   6746  -5865 -14310 -51040  -7891     -1   1652
   -223     -3   -566     -4  26892    -13  47538 -26949     -1  58930
  13166     -5    169  78945      7   4135   -681   1863    -83  -2037

You could wrap these up as functions or even use them to overload disp as suggested in the comments to the OP.

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