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Does anyone here know the significant difference of single CASE statement with many WHEN against multiple CASE statements?

eg.

SELECT
  blah
  , CASE WHEN x THEN 'abc'
      WHEN y THEN 'deF'
      WHEN z THEN 'gHi'
    ELSE END

  , CASE WHEN x THEN 'abc' ELSE
      CASE WHEN y THEN 'deF' ELSE
        CASE WHEN z THEN 'gHi' ELSE
        END
      END
    END

.

Thanks in advance for the insights!

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1  
first one boils down to if/then/else/else. Second one is if(if(if())) –  Marc B Oct 27 '11 at 16:23
    
"ELSE END" is a syntax error at least under 5.0. Omit the "ELSE" or say "ELSE NULL END". –  pilcrow Oct 27 '11 at 16:41

2 Answers 2

Not fully sure of what you want to hear but... Multiple WHEN clauses exist so you don't need to nest CASE statements.

Edit:

To clarify things: both constructs can do the same things, but nested CASEs makes code more messy and unreadable. A similar example:

SELECT
    CONCAT_WS(' ', 'A', CONCAT_WS(' ', 'B', CONCAT_WS(' ', 'C'))) AS nested,
    CONCAT_WS(' ', 'A', 'B', 'C') AS multiple
share|improve this answer
    
so, to use one or the other is essentially the same? –  dat789 Oct 27 '11 at 16:30
    
@dat789 - See my update. –  Álvaro G. Vicario Oct 27 '11 at 16:51

From How to Write Unmaintainable Code:

The Nested Switch
(a switch within a switch) is the most difficult type of nesting for the human mind to unravel.

It's an opinion, for sure, but one I can't argue with. (Of course, case and switch are different syntax for the same logical construct.) Your second formulation is just unnecessarily nasty, so avoid it unless you have a really good reason.

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Well happy days! Thanks all! This definitely clarifies the question I had in mind for a while now. –  dat789 Oct 27 '11 at 19:10

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