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CF: Carry Flag

ZF: Zero Flag

i'm current read a book on intel x86 assembly on linux platform using AT&T syntax,and the book said,the effect of setbe D is qeuivalent to:

DCF & ~ ZF

i understood that,but could it simply write as:

D ← CF|ZF

this only different from ~ZF&CF when CF/ZF is either 1/1,or 1/0.which one is more accurate?

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okay, I'm still not grasping the question, but the truth table should let you figure it out. –  Charlie Martin Apr 27 '09 at 1:28
    
Tell us more about what you're trying to do. CF is the carry flag (I admit I had to look it up) and ZF is the zero flag. So it sounds like you're asking if the result carry bit is set and it's not zero. –  Charlie Martin Apr 27 '09 at 1:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

setbe sets the result to 1 if (ZF=1) or (CF=1). If the documentation you're reading says that it sets it on (ZF=0) and (CF=1), it's wrong. See the 80386 Programmer's Reference Manual. Below is a detailed analysis:

setbe sets the result to 1 if the result of the preceding comparison was below-or-equal, when compared as unsigned integers (the equivalent for signed integers would be setle, for less-or-equal).

When cmp instruction is performed, the destination operand is subtracted from the source operand, and the result is discarded. The only output is the setting of the condition flags. Remember that when we subtract two numbers A-B, we're really adding A+(~B)+1 in two's complement, where ~B is the one's complement of B (i.e. all the bits are flipped).

Let's look at 6 cases:

Case 0: Compare 1 to 0
    0 - 1
  = 0 + ~1 + 1
  = 0x00000000 + 0xfffffffe + 1
  = 0xffffffff ≠ 0, no carry
  ==> ZF = 0, CF = 0

Case 1: Compare 0 to 0
    0 - 0
  = 0 + ~0 + 1
  = 0x00000000 + 0xffffffff + 1
  = 0x00000000 = 0, with carry
  ==> ZF = 1, CF = 0

Case 2: Compare 0 to 1
    1 - 0
  = 1 + ~0 + 1
  = 0x00000001 + 0xffffffff + 1
  = 0x00000001 ≠ 0, with carry
  ==> ZF = 0, CF = 1

Case 3: Compare UINT_MAX to 0
    0 - 4294967295
  = 0 + ~4294967295 + 1
  = 0x00000000 + 0x00000000 + 1
  = 0x00000001 ≠ 0, no carry
  ==> ZF = 0, CF = 0

Case 4: Compare 0 to UINT_MAX
    4294967295 - 0
  = 4294967295 + ~0 + 1
  = 0xffffffff + 0xffffffff + 1
  = 0xffffffff ≠ 0, with carry
  ==> ZF = 0, CF = 1

Case 5: Compare UINT_MAX to UINT_MAX
    4294967295 - 4294967295
  = 4294967295 + ~4294967295 + 1
  = 0xffffffff + 0x00000000 + 1
  = 0x00000000 = 0, with carry
  ==> ZF = 1, CF = 1

The cases in which the first argument is below-or-equal to the second are cases 1, 2, 4, and 5. All of these satisfy (ZF=1) or (CF=1), and the remaining cases in which the comparison is false satisfy the opposite condition, (ZF=0) and (CF=0). Note that we've also enumerated all possible combinations of CF and ZF. Hence, we conclude that the correct behavior for setbe is to set on (ZF=1) or (CF=1).

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Think of the truth tables.

| CF | ZF | CF &~ZF | CF|ZF |
+---------------------------+
   0    0      0        0
   0    1      0        1
   1    0      1        1
   1    1      0        1

The truth tables are different, so no, they're not the same.

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Should DF → ZF? –  Alphaneo Apr 27 '09 at 1:28
    
i know the truethhood between these two are different,so tha't the reason why i'am asking which one is more accurate.anyway,thanks! –  623HS Apr 27 '09 at 1:30
    
the question lies on row 2&3 of this table.i thought row 2 and 4 represents the fact of equal and less-than-and-equal respectively.i thought both these two situation should be 1,thus the question CF|ZF. –  623HS Apr 27 '09 at 1:34
    
sorry typo, row 2 and row 4. –  623HS Apr 27 '09 at 1:35

SETBE is below or equal (CF=1 or ZF=1) Are you sure CF & ~ZF is correct? Could the instruction be SETB or SETL ?

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