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More Clojure weirdness. I have this function I'm trying to define and call. It has 3 arguments, but when I call it with 3 arguments I get

Wrong number of args (1) passed to: solr-query$correct-doc-in-results-QMARK-$fn
 [Thrown class clojure.lang.ArityException]

when I call it with 2 arguments I get

Wrong number of args (2) passed to: solr-query$correct-doc-in-results-QMARK-
  [Thrown class clojure.lang.ArityException]

and when I call it with 4 arguments I get

Wrong number of args (4) passed to: solr-query$correct-doc-in-results-QMARK-
  [Thrown class clojure.lang.ArityException]

here is the definition of the function:

(defn correct-doc-in-results? [query results docid]
  "Check if the docid we expected is returned in the results"
  (some #(.equals docid) (map :id (get results query))))

and here is how I'm trying to call it (from the REPL using swank in emacs):

(correct-doc-in-results? "FLASHLIGHT" all-queries "60184")

anyone have any idea what's going on? Why does it think I'm only passing in 1 argument when I am passing 3, but gets it right for 2 or 4? I'm not a very fluent clojure programmer yet, but defining a function is pretty basic.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Note the difference between

solr-query$correct-doc-in-results-QMARK-

and

solr-query$correct-doc-in-results-QMARK-$fn

The first refers to your function correct-doc-in-results?. The latter refers to some anonymous function defined inside that function.

If you pass 2 or 4 arguments, you're getting an error for your toplevel function, as expected. When you pass 3 arguments, you're getting an error for #(.equals docid), because #(.equals docid) wants zero arguments but is getting one. Try changing it to #(.equals % docid).

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Of course. Thanks for the simple explanation. –  Dave Kincaid Oct 27 '11 at 18:03
1  
@Brian actually the error is because the anonymous function wants zero args (has no %) and is getting one when called by some. Of course, if the function actually were called with no arguments, then it would cause another error by trying to call .equals with only one argument. –  amalloy Oct 27 '11 at 18:38
    
You're right, I'll edit my answer. –  Brian Carper Oct 27 '11 at 18:44

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