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Can someone explain to my why adding either padding or border to a container element has an effect on how the floating div is displayed?

Sample 1 & 4 display how I expect. Sample 2 & 3 do not.

This is really driving me crazy!

It behaves strangely in both Webkit and FireFox. Have not tested IE.

<div style="">
    <div style="border: 1px solid green; float: right;">This float is correct</div>
    <h3 style="margin: 20px 0px; border: 1px solid blue;">Sample 1</h3>
    <p>Parent has nothing</p>
</div>

<div style="padding: 1px;">
    <div style="border: 1px solid green; float: right;">This float is incorrect</div>
    <h3 style="margin: 20px 0px; border: 1px solid blue;">Sample 2</h3>
    <p>Parent has padding</p>
</div>

<div style="border: 1px solid red;">
    <div style="border: 1px solid green; float: right;">This float is incorrect</div>
    <h3 style="margin: 20px 0px; border: 1px solid blue;">Sample 3</h3>
    <p>Parent has border</p>
</div>

<div style="padding: 1px;">
    <div style="border: 1px solid green; float: right;">This float is correct</div>
    <h3 style="margin: 0px 0px; border: 1px solid blue;">Sample 4</h3>
    <p>Parent has padding, H3 has no margin</p>
</div>
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I have just heard confirmation that it also does this in IE8. Why do all three rendering engines agree? –  Paul Wieland Oct 27 '11 at 18:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

What you are witnessing is "margin collapse" which occurs when two elements are on top of each other. The reason it goes away is you add the border or outline to one of the elements. From the W3C:

In this specification, the expression collapsing margins means that adjoining margins (no non-empty content, padding, or border areas, or clearance separate them) of two or more boxes (which may be next to one another or nested) combine to form a single margin.

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I think actually 2, 3 and 4 are rendered like they should be and 1 looks a bit weird.

  • 1 the top margin of the header is ignored while it is clearly set. It is kind of weird since the p in the first example is respecting the margin of h3. Adding overflow: hidden to the encapsulating div seems to sort it so it respects the margin of h3.
  • 2 and 3 the margin of h3 is respected
  • 4 you removed the margin trough style.
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The top margin isn't ignored in Sample 1. The <h3> is pushed down from the top of the page as it should be by the margin amount. The only thing that moved is the floating div. –  Paul Wieland Oct 27 '11 at 18:12
    
No if you inspect the div around sample 1 in firefox or chrome you will see it doesnt wrap it like it should be doing, where it does wrap it properly in all other cases –  Benjamin Udink ten Cate Oct 27 '11 at 18:14

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