Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have terminal.app set to accept utf-8 and in bash I can type unicode characters, copy and paste them, but if I start the python shell I can't and if I try to decode unicode I get errors:

>>> wtf = u'\xe4\xf6\xfc'.decode()
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
UnicodeEncodeError: 'ascii' codec can't encode characters in position 0-2: ordinal not in range(128)
>>> wtf = u'\xe4\xf6\xfc'.decode('utf-8')
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "/System/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.5/lib/python2.5/encodings/utf_8.py", line 16, in decode
    return codecs.utf_8_decode(input, errors, True)
UnicodeEncodeError: 'ascii' codec can't encode characters in position 0-2: ordinal not in range(128)

Anyone know what I'm doing wrong?

share|improve this question
    
This answer in a related question about encoding/decoding might be of help. –  tzot Apr 27 '09 at 10:12

4 Answers 4

up vote 16 down vote accepted

I think there is encode/decode confusion all over the place. You start with an unicode object:

u'\xe4\xf6\xfc'

This is an unicode object, the three characters are the unicode codepoints for "äöü". If you want to turn them into Utf-8, you have to encode them:

>>> u'\xe4\xf6\xfc'.encode('utf-8')
'\xc3\xa4\xc3\xb6\xc3\xbc'

The resulting six characters are the Utf-8 representation of "äöü".

If you call decode(...), you try to interpret the characters as some encoding that still needs to be converted to unicode. Since it already is Unicode, this doesn't work. Your first call tries a Ascii to Unicode conversion, the second call a Utf-8 to Unicode conversion. Since u'\xe4\xf6\xfc' is neither valid Ascii nor valid Utf-8 these conversion attempts fail.

Further confusion might come from the fact that '\xe4\xf6\xfc' is also the Latin1/ISO-8859-1 encoding of "äöü". If you write a normal python string (without the leading "u" that marks it as unicode), you can convert it to an unicode object with decode('latin1'):

>>> '\xe4\xf6\xfc'.decode('latin1')
u'\xe4\xf6\xfc'
share|improve this answer
1  
aha. This finally makes sense. –  Bjorn Tipling Apr 27 '09 at 4:18
    
Agreed. Sense has been made. –  Mike Boers Apr 27 '09 at 14:33

I think you have encoding and decoding backwards. You encode Unicode into a byte stream, and decode the byte stream into Unicode.

Python 2.6.1 (r261:67515, Dec  6 2008, 16:42:21) 
[GCC 4.0.1 (Apple Computer, Inc. build 5370)] on darwin
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> wtf = u'\xe4\xf6\xfc'
>>> wtf
u'\xe4\xf6\xfc'
>>> print wtf
äöü
>>> wtf.encode('UTF-8')
'\xc3\xa4\xc3\xb6\xc3\xbc'
>>> print '\xc3\xa4\xc3\xb6\xc3\xbc'.decode('utf-8')
äöü
share|improve this answer
1  
Um. UTF-8 is an already encoded byte stream, so, while not backwards, you got it sideways at least :) Perhaps you meant Unicode instead of UTF-8. I'll edit your post and let you decide. –  tzot Apr 27 '09 at 10:09
    
Yes, you are right. Thanks! –  Mike Boers Apr 27 '09 at 14:31
>>> wtf = '\xe4\xf6\xfc'
>>> wtf
'\xe4\xf6\xfc'
>>> print wtf
���
>>> print wtf.decode("latin-1")
äöü
>>> wtf_unicode = unicode(wtf.decode("latin-1"))
>>> wtf_unicode
u'\xe4\xf6\xfc'
>>> print wtf_unicode
äöü
share|improve this answer

The Unicode strings section of the introductory tutorial explains it well :

To convert a Unicode string into an 8-bit string using a specific encoding, Unicode objects provide an encode() method that takes one argument, the name of the encoding. Lowercase names for encodings are preferred.

>>> u"äöü".encode('utf-8')
'\xc3\xa4\xc3\xb6\xc3\xbc'
share|improve this answer
1  
aren't you decoding characters then in your last line? –  Bjorn Tipling Apr 27 '09 at 2:28
    
Yep, I've removed my fatigued-wrongness, the unicode strings section explains it better than I can.. –  dbr Apr 27 '09 at 15:18

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.