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I am looping through a CSV file in PHP 5.3 and checking for dates. I have been using strtotime(), and it has worked well, except for one field I have that contains either a 1 or 2 char code.

strtotime() on any single char code seems to act like I am asking for now(), but if the code is 2 chars, it fails, as I would expect it to.

What am I not understanding about the way strtotime() works?

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I cannot reproduce that behavior –  Michael Berkowski Oct 27 '11 at 17:59
    
var_dump(strtotime('a')); produces bool(false) –  Michael Berkowski Oct 27 '11 at 17:59
    
@Michael: On my test system (Win7x64/PHP 5.3.4) it produces a timestamp. –  Jon Oct 27 '11 at 18:00
    
@Michael: What's your version of PHP? –  BoltClock Oct 27 '11 at 18:01
    
codepad.org/uJkeLD2W produces appropriate results. –  George Cummins Oct 27 '11 at 18:02
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Take a look at http://www.php.net/manual/en/datetime.formats.time.php time formats. It seems that 'a' is a timezone. It might just be a mistake that 'a' works and it's resolving to something else, but at least that's the explanation.

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Military timezones. See stackoverflow.com/questions/7920200/… –  nachito Oct 27 '11 at 18:14
    
This appears to be the culprit as @Johan B.W. de Vries showed. This is just not what I was expecting. –  ursasmar Oct 27 '11 at 18:17
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strtotime basically does it best to interpret what it your text means, I don't think you can rely on it failing on certain strings.

Example:

<?php

echo 'Now: ' . date('c') . PHP_EOL;
echo PHP_EOL;
for($c = 'A'; $c <= 'z'; $c = chr(ord($c) + 1)) {
    echo $c . ' - ' . date('c', strtotime($c)) . PHP_EOL;
}

If I put the output next to http://www.timeanddate.com/library/abbreviations/timezones/military/ , I can only support @tandu 's conclusion that it interprets it as timezones (including the J letter that results in an invalid date).

It's a best effort, I guess. If you have a problem with the way it deals with single letters, add a check up front. Not really nice, but that's what you get when you try to parse irregular data.

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I have added a check for a minimum string length and it is working for now. –  ursasmar Oct 27 '11 at 18:18
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echo ((time() - strtotime('a')) / (60 * 60));

This should equal your current timezone since PHP interprets "a" as the TZ.

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Well, PHP's obviously doing SOMETHING with single-char timestamps in strtotime():

Running:

<?php

$now = time();
foreach(range('a', 'z') as $char) {
   $t = strtotime($char, $now);
   echo "$now ($char) -> $t {", ($now - $t), "} [", date($char, $now), "]\n";
}

gives me:

1319739230 (a) -> 1319717630 {21600} [pm]
1319739230 (b) -> 1319714030 {25200} [b]
1319739230 (c) -> 1319710430 {28800} [2011-10-27T13:13:50-05:00]
1319739230 (d) -> 1319706830 {32400} [27]
1319739230 (e) -> 1319703230 {36000} [America/Chicago]
1319739230 (f) -> 1319699630 {39600} [f]
1319739230 (g) -> 1319696030 {43200} [1]
1319739230 (h) -> 1319692430 {46800} [01]
1319739230 (i) -> 1319688830 {50400} [13]
1319739230 (j) ->  {1319739230} [27]
1319739230 (k) -> 1319685230 {54000} [k]
1319739230 (l) -> 1319681630 {57600} [Thursday]
1319739230 (m) -> 1319678030 {61200} [10]
1319739230 (n) -> 1319724830 {14400} [10]
1319739230 (o) -> 1319728430 {10800} [2011]
1319739230 (p) -> 1319732030 {7200} [p]
1319739230 (q) -> 1319735630 {3600} [q]
1319739230 (r) -> 1319739230 {0} [Thu, 27 Oct 2011 13:13:50 -0500]
1319739230 (s) -> 1319742830 {-3600} [50]
1319739230 (t) -> 1319746430 {-7200} [31]
1319739230 (u) -> 1319750030 {-10800} [000000]
1319739230 (v) -> 1319753630 {-14400} [v]
1319739230 (w) -> 1319757230 {-18000} [4]
1319739230 (x) -> 1319760830 {-21600} [x]
1319739230 (y) -> 1319764430 {-25200} [11]
1319739230 (z) -> 1319721230 {18000} [299]

Very odd that 'j' for a character fails utterly to return something, but the rest return SOMETHING.

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