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I am doing a very simple xslt to convert a html page to a xml file.

But it appears to me that the starting point is not that straightforward to me.My first goal is to convert a <html> tag into a <topic> tag.

I did the following xslt:

 <xsl:template match="@*|node()">
    <xsl:apply-templates select="@*|node()"/> 

 <xsl:template match="/">

 <xsl:template match="html">
    <xsl:text> Conversion Test</xsl:text>

However, now after I run this xslt, the result xml is purely of the same content of the original html page, it seems that the third template match that I wrote (to match the <html> tag) never gets hit.

The source html looks like:

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN" "">
 <html xmlns="">

Could experts help me a little here?

share|improve this question
Can you give an example of your html? (especially any namespaces like xmlns="") – Daniel Haley Oct 27 '11 at 18:24
@DevNull, I updated my question with the source html – Kevin Oct 27 '11 at 18:29
Thanks. Good question +1 – Daniel Haley Oct 27 '11 at 18:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

XSLT 1.0:

Try adding xmlns:x="" to your xsl:stylesheet and changing your match to match="x:html". (Note: you don't have to use "x"; you can choose anything you want.)

XSLT 2.0:

Either use the above method or replace the namespace prefix in your match(es) to "*" (match="*:html"). You could also add xpath-default-namespace="" to the xsl:stylesheet.

share|improve this answer
thank you, it worked! Yes, the html is actually xhtml and I am using XSLT1.0, after put in your suggested namespace, worked great:) – Kevin Oct 27 '11 at 18:38
I updated the title to reflect the nature of the source document too. – Kevin Oct 27 '11 at 18:39
@Kevin - You're very welcome. Also, if you don't want the namespace in your XML output, add exclude-result-prefixes="#all" to xsl:stylesheet. (Note: you can replace #all with x to exclude x specifically. – Daniel Haley Oct 27 '11 at 18:45

You may want to try to remove the first template or make it more specific than matching every node with node().

share|improve this answer
Are you saying remove the identity transform? – Daniel Haley Oct 27 '11 at 18:29
@lkuty, I did try removing the first template. Now the resulting xml is simply a big node of text without any markup. It contains all the text from the original html page. – Kevin Oct 27 '11 at 18:31
I was wrong. I thought the first rule could be chosen insted of the third but in fact the default priority for a match pattern with an element is greater than node() and thus it could not be the problem. I just didn't think about NS. – lkuty Oct 28 '11 at 7:12

The purpose of XSLT is to transform XML documents into other XML documents. HTML is not a XML document. While XHTML is XML, it is actually HTML reformulated so I'm just not sure what you want to do is easy or possible with XSLT.

share|improve this answer
So NOW you update the title :). That reflects my problem with this. – Rob Oct 27 '11 at 18:43

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