Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've got a relatively simple WPF application. The idea is to present a list of items to the user; for each item there is a checkbox to select/deselect the item.

My code, simplified, looks a bit like this:

 class Thing { /* ... */ };
 public static int SelectedCount { get; set; }
 public class SelectableThing
 {
        private bool _selected;
        public bool Selected { 
            get { return _selected; }
            set { _selected = value; if (value) { SelectedCount++; } else { SelectedCount--; } } 
        }
        public Thing thing { get; set; }
 };
 private ObservableCollection<SelectableThing> _selectableThings;
 public Collection<SelectableThing> { get { return _selectableThings; } }
 <DataGrid ItemSource="{Binding Path=SelectableThings}">
      <DataGridCheckBoxColumn Binding="{Binding Selected}"/>
      <DataGridTextColumn Binding="{Binding Thing.name}"/>
 </DataGrid>
 <Button Content="{Binding Path=SelectedTestCount}" Click="someFunc" />

So the idea is that the button content should show the count of tests selected. This should be accomplished because whenever SelectableThing.Selected is set, it should increment/decrement the SelectedCount as appropriate.

However, as far as I can tell the behavior doesn't work. The button text displays "0", regardless of selecting/deselecting items in the list.

Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
Are you using viewmodels or just code-behind? –  Yatrix Oct 27 '11 at 20:49
    
I'm using viewmodels. –  Stephen Gross Oct 27 '11 at 21:29

2 Answers 2

This problem is a little hairy since you have multiple view-model classes involved. Here's a crack at the code to solve this. The only thing I'm missing is that the DataGrid doesn't seem to update your items until you leave the row.

At start, before any edits.  The save button is disabled, and the count is zero After some edits.  The save button is enabled, and the count is updated

XAML:

<Window x:Class="WpfApplication1.MainWindow"
        xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
        xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
        Title="MainWindow" Height="350" Width="525">
    <Grid>
        <Grid.RowDefinitions>
            <RowDefinition Height="*"/>
            <RowDefinition Height="Auto"/>
        </Grid.RowDefinitions>
        <DataGrid AutoGenerateColumns="False"
                  ItemsSource="{Binding Path=SelectableThings}"
                  Grid.Row="0" Margin="6">
            <DataGrid.Columns>
                <DataGridCheckBoxColumn Header="IsSelected"
                                        Binding="{Binding IsSelected}"/>
                <DataGridTextColumn Header="Name" Binding="{Binding Name}"/>
            </DataGrid.Columns>
        </DataGrid>
        <Button Content="{Binding Path=SelectedTestCount}"
                Command="{Binding SaveCommand}"
                Grid.Row="1" Width="75" Height="23"
                HorizontalAlignment="Right" Margin="0,0,6,6"/>
    </Grid>
</Window>

Thing class:

public class Thing : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    private readonly List<SelectableThing> selectableThings;
    private DelegateCommand saveCommand;

    public Thing(IEnumerable<SelectableThing> selectableThings)
    {
        this.selectableThings = new List<SelectableThing>(selectableThings);
        this.SelectableThings =
            new ObservableCollection<SelectableThing>(this.selectableThings);

        this.SaveCommand = this.saveCommand = new DelegateCommand(
            o => Save(),
            o => SelectableThings.Any(t => t.IsSelected)
            );

        // Bind children to change event
        foreach (var selectableThing in this.selectableThings)
        {
            selectableThing.PropertyChanged += SelectableThingChanged;
        }

        SelectableThings.CollectionChanged += SelectableThingsChanged;
    }

    public ObservableCollection<SelectableThing> SelectableThings
    {
        get;
        private set;
    }

    public int SelectedTestCount
    {
        get { return SelectableThings.Where(t => t.IsSelected).Count(); }
    }

    public ICommand SaveCommand { get; private set; }

    private void Save()
    {
        // Todo: Implement
    }

    private void SelectableThingChanged(object sender,
        PropertyChangedEventArgs args)
    {
        if (args.PropertyName == "IsSelected")
        {
            RaisePropertyChanged("SelectedTestCount");
            saveCommand.RaiseCanExecuteChanged();
        }
    }

    private void SelectableThingsChanged(object sender,
        NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        foreach (SelectableThing selectableThing in
            e.OldItems ?? new List<SelectableThing>())
        {
            selectableThing.PropertyChanged -= SelectableThingChanged;
            RaisePropertyChanged("SelectedTestCount");
        }

        foreach (SelectableThing selectableThing in
            e.NewItems ?? new List<SelectableThing>())
        {
            selectableThing.PropertyChanged += SelectableThingChanged;
            RaisePropertyChanged("SelectedTestCount");
        }
    }

    public void RaisePropertyChanged(string propertyName)
    {
        if(PropertyChanged != null)
        {
            PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
        }
    }

    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;
}

SelectableThing class:

public class SelectableThing : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    private string name;
    private bool isSelected;

    public SelectableThing(string name)
    {
        this.name = name;
    }

    public string Name
    {
        get { return name; }
        set
        {
            name = value;
            RaisePropertyChanged("Name");
        }
    }

    public bool IsSelected
    {
        get { return isSelected; }
        set
        {
            isSelected = value;
            RaisePropertyChanged("IsSelected");
        }
    }

    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    private void RaisePropertyChanged(string propertyName)
    {
        if (PropertyChanged != null)
        {
            PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
        }
    }
}

Original Answer:

Bind Command to an ICommand. Set your CanExecute on the ICommand to return false when your condition isn't satisified.

In the setter for that IsSelected property, when the value changes, raise the CanExecuteChanged event.

The Command binding on a Button automatically enables/disables the button based on the result of CanExecute.

For more information on how to do this, including an implementation of ICommand that you could use here, see this mini-MVVM tutorial I wrote up for another question.

To fill out the implementaiton of CanExecute, I'd use something like Linq's .Any method. Then you don't have to bother checking Count, and can terminate the loop early if you find that any item is checked.

For example:

this.SaveCommand = new DelegateCommand(Save, CanSave);

// ...

private void Save(object unusedArg)
{
    // Todo: Implement
}

private bool CanSave(object unusedArg)
{
    return SelectableThings.Any(t => t.IsSelected);
}

Or since it is short, use a lambda inline:

this.SaveCommand = new DelegateCommand(Save,
    o => SelectableThings.Any(t => t.IsSelected)
    );
share|improve this answer
    
The bit about raising CanExecuteChanged based on IsSelected changing might be tricky, since it looks like you're using a collection of child view models. You could subscribe to INotifyPropertyChanged on each, and forward the event to this.SaveCommand.RaiseCanExecuteChanged(). Let me know if you have troubles figuring this part out. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Oct 27 '11 at 20:14
    
Also note I suggest you name the property IsSelected. You should follow this convention when naming boolean values (Is, Can, Has, etc). –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Oct 27 '11 at 20:16
    
I've amended the original question to reflect your input; can you let me know your thoughts on it? –  Stephen Gross Oct 27 '11 at 21:22
    
@StephenGross: While using a static member might work, it is a hack. You couldn't support multiple instances of whatever class hold that property (Thing?). It will also be harder to write unit tests for this code. I'm also not sure if WPF can bind to static properties or not, or if INotifyPropertyChanged would work on it. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Oct 27 '11 at 21:27
    
Yeah, the only reason I used a static int is that otherwise you can't change it from inside SelectableThing.Selected.set(). –  Stephen Gross Oct 27 '11 at 21:30

Bind the Content of the button to a field in your viewmodel and fire the OnChanged method for that field every time another item is selected or unselected. Bind the IsEnabled to a boolean field in your view model and set it to true/false as appropriate to enable or disable the button.

share|improve this answer
    
I've amended the original question to try this out, but probably have got it wrong (!)... –  Stephen Gross Oct 27 '11 at 21:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.