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I'm a .NET developer and know pretty much about OOP. However, recently I noticed one interesting fact.

System.Data.SqlClient.SqlCommand derives from System.Data.Common.DbCommand. The latter implements System.IDbCommand. System.IDbCommand exposes the property Connection which an instance of IDbConnection. In DbCommand However this property returns DbConnection type. And finally the same property in SqlCommand is of type SqlConnection

I've tried to perform the same however it gave a compile time error. How was this achieved in above example and how can I recreate the same pattern?

My code (not compiling):

public interface IFoo { }
public interface IBar 
{
   IFoo TheFoo();
}

public abstract class AbsFoo : IFoo { }
public abstract class AbsBar : IBar 
{
    public abstract AbsFoo TheFoo();
}

public class ConcreteFoo : AbsFoo { }
public class ConcreteBar : AbsBar { }
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1  
You need to use both Jason's and Richard's answers to do what SqlCommand does. Both answers are two parts of the whole. –  Enigmativity Oct 28 '11 at 2:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Explicit interface implementation is the name of the game here. Try this:

public abstract class AbsBar : IBar {
    IFoo IFoo.TheFoo() { return this.TheFoo(); }
    public abstract AbsFoo TheFoo();
}

Here's a good guide on implicit vs. explicit implementation.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm marking IBar.TheFoo() as abstract and the second method as public abstract but it still gives me a compiler error –  Oybek Oct 27 '11 at 20:08
    
Sorry, I see it is necessary to implement the explicitely declared method. I can't just make it abstract. –  Oybek Oct 27 '11 at 20:09
    
Oybek: Correct. –  Jason Oct 27 '11 at 20:11
    
This is not correct, and doesn't even compile. Implict vs. explict implementation does not solve the problem. –  Richard Hein Oct 27 '11 at 20:16
    
@Jason What using directives? Your code doesn't compile. And the reason why SqlCommand can have Connection return a different type is than DbCommand is because Connection is simply a public property. You compilation error is "The modifier 'abstract' is not valid for this item". The documentation is wrong, look in Object Browser and you'll see the signature for DbCommand.Connection is public DbConnection Connection { get; set; }, and the signature for SqlCommand.Connection is public SqlConnection Connection { get; set; }. I'm looking right at it. –  Richard Hein Oct 27 '11 at 21:34

I have to say that I think Richard was a little hard done by - his answer is just as good as Jason's in that they both only answered half of the question. Put them both together and you have the full answer.

To make this work with IDbCommand, DbCommand & SqlCommand there has to be an explicit implementation of IDbCommand in DbCommand (Jason's answer) and public method shadowing in SqlCommand (Richard's answer).

I'll give the full "Foo/Bar" example.

Start with these interfaces:

public interface IFoo
{
    IBar GetBar();
}

public interface IBar { }

Next Foo must provide an explicit implementation of IFoo in order to return Bar, not IBar, from its own GetBar method:

public abstract class Foo : IFoo
{
    IBar IFoo.GetBar()
    {
        return this.GetBar();
    }

    public Bar GetBar()
    {
        return this.GetBarInner();
    }

    protected abstract Bar GetBarInner();
}

public abstract class Bar : IBar { }

And finally a SomeFoo class must shadow GetBar to be able to return a SomeFoo instance:

public class SomeFoo : Foo
{
    public new SomeBar GetBar()
    {
        return new SomeBar();
    }

    protected override Bar GetBarInner()
    {
        return this.GetBar();
    }
}

public class SomeBar : Bar { }

I think the only information that Richard is that my adding the new keyword to the shadowed method you get rid of the compiler error.

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Hooray for 3rd party observations. :) –  Richard Hein Oct 28 '11 at 13:06

Connection in DbCommand and SqlCommand are both just public methods. There would be a compiler warning, but it's allowed. Your code should be more like this to work like SqlCommand/DbCommand:

    public interface IFoo { }
public abstract class AbsBaseBar
{
    public IFoo TheFoo() { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
}
public class AbsFoo : IFoo { }
public class AbsBar : AbsBaseBar
{
    public AbsFoo TheFoo() { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
}

public class ConcreteFoo : AbsFoo { }
public class ConcreteBar : AbsBar { } 
share|improve this answer
    
I think you were a little hard done by here Richard - you did answer half of the question quite correctly. And Jason missed your half entirely. I gave you an upvote to get rid of the negative. –  Enigmativity Oct 28 '11 at 2:12

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