Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can the following unittest be improved, to follow good TDD design practises (naming, using rowtests, designing the classes) in any of the .NET TDD/BDD frameworks?

Also, is there a better way in any of the frameworks to have rowtests where I can have a individual expectation for each row, just like I do it in this (NUnit) example?

The system under test here is the Constraint class that can have multiple ranges of valid integers. The test test the NarrowDown method that can make the valid ranges smaller based on another constraint.

[TestFixture]
internal class ConstraintTests
{
    [Test]
    public void NarrowDown_Works()
    {
        RowTest_NarrowDown(
            new Range[] { new Range(0, 10), new Range(20, 30), new Range(40, 50) },
            new Range[] { new Range(1, 9), new Range(21, 29), new Range(41, 49) },
            new Range[] { new Range(1, 9), new Range(21, 29), new Range(41, 49) });

        RowTest_NarrowDown(
            new Range[] { new Range(0, 10), new Range(20, 30), new Range(40, 50), new Range(60, 70) },
            new Range[] { new Range(1, 9), new Range(21, 29), new Range(41, 49) },
            new Range[] { new Range(1, 9), new Range(21, 29), new Range(41, 49) });

        RowTest_NarrowDown(
            new Range[] { new Range(0, 10), new Range(20, 30), new Range(40, 50) },
            new Range[] { new Range(1, 9), new Range(21, 29), new Range(41, 49), new Range(60, 70) });
    }

    private static void RowTest_NarrowDown(IEnumerable<Range> sut, IEnumerable<Range> context)
    {
        Constraint constraint = new Constraint(sut);
        Constraint result = constraint.NarrowDown(new Constraint(context));
        Assert.That(result, Is.Null);
    }

    private static void RowTest_NarrowDown(IEnumerable<Range> sut, IEnumerable<Range> context, IEnumerable<Range> expected)
    {
        Constraint constraint = new Constraint(sut);
        Constraint result = constraint.NarrowDown(new Constraint(context));
        Assert.That(result, Is.Not.Null);
        Assert.That(result.Bounds, Is.EquivalentTo(expected));
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Each set of inputs should be an independent test. If the logic of multiple tests is identical sans the input-output, use "Parameterized Tests". NUnit uses attributes or a method that provides the different input sets to a parameterized test. Each set is executed/reported as a different test case by the test runner. –  Gishu Oct 31 '11 at 6:48
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You should use a data-driven approach with data factories (in NUnit-speak, they're called test case sources). This makes your tests a lot easier to read, understand, modify and maintain (or, more generally, a lot cleaner):

[TestFixture]
internal class ConstraintTests
{
    static object[] TwoRanges = 
    {
        new object[]
            {
                new[] { new Range(0, 10), new Range(20, 30), new Range(40, 50) },
                new[] { new Range(1, 9), new Range(21, 29), new Range(41, 49), new Range(60, 70) }
            }
    };

    static object[] ThreeRanges = 
    {
        new object[]
            {
                new[] { new Range(0, 10), new Range(20, 30), new Range(40, 50) },
                new[] { new Range(1, 9), new Range(21, 29), new Range(41, 49) },
                new[] { new Range(1, 9), new Range(21, 29), new Range(41, 49) }
            },
        new object[]
            {
                new[] { new Range(0, 10), new Range(20, 30), new Range(40, 50), new Range(60, 70) },
                new[] { new Range(1, 9), new Range(21, 29), new Range(41, 49) },
                new[] { new Range(1, 9), new Range(21, 29), new Range(41, 49) }
            }
    };

    [Test, TestCaseSource("TwoRanges")]
    public void NarrowDown_WhenCalledWithTwoRanges_GivesTheExpectedResult(IEnumerable<Range> sut, IEnumerable<Range> context)
    {
        Constraint constraint = new Constraint(sut);
        Constraint result = constraint.NarrowDown(new Constraint(context));
        Assert.That(result, Is.Null);
    }

    [Test, TestCaseSource("ThreeRanges")]
    public void NarrowDown_WhenCalledWithThreeRanges_GivesTheExpectedResult(IEnumerable<Range> sut, IEnumerable<Range> context, IEnumerable<Range> expected)
    {
        Constraint constraint = new Constraint(sut);
        Constraint result = constraint.NarrowDown(new Constraint(context));
        Assert.That(result, Is.Not.Null);
        Assert.That(result.Bounds, Is.EquivalentTo(expected));
    }
}

See how much simpler your test methods have become now? Also, this will make each set of data from the originating test case source run in a separate test, so the whole thing won't fail only because one set of data causes a failure. Remember: A test should assert only one thing.

HTH!

share|improve this answer
add comment

First, you could improve the name of your unit test NarrowDown_Works is extremely vague, and I can't tell what the class under test is supposed to be doing.

You have lots of assertions going on and lots of data, I can't tell what is important. Try to break your test into smaller tests and it will be easier to name them as well. If possible use one assertion per test.

Your construction of test data is quite complex, consider using matchers like NHamcrest to reduce the amount of assertion data you need instead of using Is.EquivalentTo.

You could also use a builder or factory constructors to to make the initialization simpler for the Constraint class simpler rather than passing in an array of Ranges.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the hint to NHamcrest –  bitbonk Nov 1 '11 at 6:45
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.