Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to use the new Auto Layout in Lion because it seems quite nice. But I can not find good information about how to do things. For example:

I have two labels:

+----------------+
| +------------+ |
| + label 1    | |
| +------------+ |
|                |
| +------------+ |
| | label 2    | |
| +------------+ |
+----------------+

but the first label gets not always populated with content, sometimes there ist just no content for it. What I would like to do is to automatically show the label 2 where label 1 would be when it would have content.

+----------------+
| +------------+ |
| + label 2    | |
| +------------+ |
|                |
|                |
|                |
|                |
+----------------+

What constrains would I have to add so it works automatically with autolayout? I understand that I could just code everything, but I have about 30 such labels and images and buttons of different styles and shapes which are all optional and I don't want to add hundrets of lines of code when it could work automatically quite nice too.

If it does not work then I will just use a WebView and do it with HTML and CSS.

share|improve this question
    
I’m not sure if that’s possible with auto layout but it looks like what you really want is a table. –  Bavarious Oct 27 '11 at 21:56
    
A table would help if it would just be from the top to bottom, but some stuff are too from left to right and should take the place of others and stuff. But the idea is not bad I admit. –  Jeena Oct 28 '11 at 6:28

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I don't think you could do it that way. If you made the layout for label 2 be based on a distance constraint from label 1, even if you made label 1 auto-collapse to zero height when it has no content, label 2 is still going to be that distance down, ie in:

+----------------+
| +------------+ |
| + label 1    | |
| +------------+ |
|        ^       |
|        ^       !
| +------------+ |
| | label 2    | |
| +------------+ |
+----------------+

Where ^ is the autolayout distance constraint - If Label 1 knows how to become zero height when it's string is empty, you're still going to get:

+----------------+
| +------------+ |
|        ^       |
|        ^       !
| +------------+ |
| | label 2    | |
| +------------+ |
+----------------+

Maybe it is possible by creating your NSLayoutConstraint manually. You could make the second attribute be the height of label 1, make the constant zero, and then carefully work out what the multiplier would be to make the distance be what you want based on a multiple of the non-zero label height.

But having done all this, you've now coded an NSLabel subclass that auto-sizes, created a constraint object manually instead of via the visual language, and bent NSLayoutConstraint beyond its will.

I think you're better off just changing the frame of label 2 if label 1's string is blank!

share|improve this answer
    
without setting constant to 0. is that any direct option available in interface builder? –  user2223516 Aug 7 '14 at 4:48

This is possible with auto layout, but doesn't exactly scale well.

So, taking your example, let's say you have label A, and label B (or button or anything else really). First start by adding a top constraint to the superview for A. Then a vertical spacing constraint between A and B. This is all normal so far. If you were to remove A at this point, B would have ambiguous layout. If you were to hide it, it would still occupy it's space including the space between the labels.

Next you need to add another constraint from B, to the top of the superview. Change the priority on this to be lower than the others (say 900) and then set it's constant to be standard (or other smaller value). Now, when A is removed from it's superview, the lower priority constraint will kick in and pull B towards the top. The constraints look something like this:

Interface Builder screenshot

The issue comes when you try to do this with a long list of labels.

share|improve this answer
    
how does the second part of this work? If you add another constraint from B to the superview, doesn't it always trigger regardless of the priority? –  kevinl Jan 8 '14 at 22:37
    
nevermind, I was trying to use this specific logic on my scenario which didn't end up working: I have Button A, B, C. I'm removing B, and I want C to take the place of B. –  kevinl Jan 8 '14 at 22:45
    
This is a clean solution for the case presented. For the case of more labels, it would probably be easiest to replicate this in code. IB suggests a solution in the pop-up "Add new constraint" editor, when it references "nearest neighbor". If it actually did just that, it would work out of the box. I think the problem is that they are binding ("neigbhor") too early, and you can see this in the storyboard file format. –  chrisco Oct 14 '14 at 19:50

Collapsing UILabel subclass

One simple solution is to just subclass UILabel and change the intrinsic content size.

@implementation WBSCollapsingLabel

- (CGSize)intrinsicContentSize
{
    if (self.isHidden) {
        return CGSizeMake(UIViewNoIntrinsicMetric, 0.0f);
    } else {
        return [super intrinsicContentSize];
    }
}

- (void)setHidden:(BOOL)hidden
{
    [super setHidden:hidden];

    [self updateConstraintsIfNeeded];
    [self layoutIfNeeded];
}

@end
share|improve this answer
1  
This seems like a really simple, elegant way to go. I'm curious why it hasn't been voted higher if it actually does work? –  software evolved Jun 10 '14 at 16:57
    
Well... great question. In general auto layout topics haven't been well covered on SO. I also think many people just hook up an outlet to the constraint and whack the height. Sub-classing is also a bit annoying. –  Cameron Lowell Palmer Jun 13 '14 at 11:56
    
The problem with this approach is that it does not take into account the margins you usually have around your views. –  tcurdt Jul 2 '14 at 15:02
    
The margins as in H:|-(8)-[view1]-(12)-[hidden1]-(8)-|? Yeah... You're right, but that is the same problem when you had with frames. You'll still have to make sure the spacing between view is handled, but that is a separate question! –  Cameron Lowell Palmer Jul 4 '14 at 15:50
1  
This is such a neat solution it works in Cocoa as well, just switch UIViewNoIntrinsicMetric to NSViewNoInstrinsicMetric, updateConstraintsIfNeeded to updateConstraintsForSubtreeIfNeeded and layoutIfNeeded to layoutSubtreeIfNeeded and it works like a charm. Thank you! –  bithavoc Feb 20 at 5:12

This category makes collapsing Auto Layout constrained views really simple:

https://github.com/depth42/AutolayoutExtensions

I just added it to a project and it works great.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm trying to use this in my project, but new public outlet PWHidingMasterView doesn't appear in Xcode for the views on my project. When I open the sample project the outlet is there. I cannot figure out what's different from my project and the sample one. Any tips? –  Ricardo Sánchez-Sáez Mar 13 '14 at 1:30

Here's an example of how I handled this programmatically rather than using Interface Builder. In summary; I only add the view if it's enabled and then iterate over subviews, adding vertical constraints as I go.

Note that the views in question are initialized prior to this.

/*
  Begin Auto Layout
*/
NSMutableArray *constraints = [NSMutableArray array];
NSMutableDictionary *views = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] init];


/*
  Label One
*/
if (enableLabelOne) {
    [contentView addSubview:self.labelOne];

    self.labelOne.translatesAutoresizingMaskIntoConstraints = NO;

    [views setObject:self.labelOne
              forKey:@"_labelOne"];

    [constraints addObjectsFromArray:[NSLayoutConstraint constraintsWithVisualFormat:@"V:[_labelOne(44)]"
                                                                             options:0
                                                                             metrics:nil
                                                                               views:views]];

    [constraints addObjectsFromArray:[NSLayoutConstraint constraintsWithVisualFormat:@"H:|-[_labelOne]-|"
                                                                             options:0
                                                                             metrics:nil
                                                                               views:views]];
}

/*
    Label Two
*/
if (enableLabelTwo) {
    [contentView addSubview:self.labelTwo];

    self.labelTwo.translatesAutoresizingMaskIntoConstraints = NO;

    [views setObject:self.labelTwo
              forKey:@"_labelTwo"];

    [constraints addObjectsFromArray:[NSLayoutConstraint constraintsWithVisualFormat:@"V:[_labelTwo(44)]"
                                                                             options:0
                                                                             metrics:nil
                                                                               views:views]];
}

[constraints addObjectsFromArray:[NSLayoutConstraint constraintsWithVisualFormat:@"H:|-[_labelTwo]-|"
                                                                         options:0
                                                                         metrics:nil
                                                                           views:views]];

/*
  Dynamically add vertical spacing constraints to subviews
*/
NSArray *subviews = [contentView subviews];

if ([subviews count] > 0) {
    UIView *firstView = [subviews objectAtIndex:0];
    UIView *secondView = nil;
    UIView *lastView = [subviews lastObject];

    [constraints addObjectsFromArray:[NSLayoutConstraint constraintsWithVisualFormat:@"V:|-[firstView]"
                                                                             options:0
                                                                             metrics:nil
                                                                               views:NSDictionaryOfVariableBindings(firstView)]];

    for (int i = 1; i < [subviews count]; i++) {
        secondView = [subviews objectAtIndex:i];
        [constraints addObjectsFromArray:[NSLayoutConstraint constraintsWithVisualFormat:@"V:[firstView]-10-[secondView]"
                                                                                 options:0
                                                                                 metrics:nil
                                                                                   views:NSDictionaryOfVariableBindings(firstView, secondView)]];
        firstView = secondView;
    }

    [constraints addObjectsFromArray:[NSLayoutConstraint constraintsWithVisualFormat:@"V:[lastView]-|"
                                                                             options:0
                                                                             metrics:nil
                                                                               views:NSDictionaryOfVariableBindings(lastView)]];
}


[self addConstraints:constraints];

I'm only setting the lastView constraint because this code was adapted from something inside of a UIScrollView.

I originally implemented this based on this Stack Overflow answer and changed things to suit my own needs.

share|improve this answer

I found a seemlingly decent way to do this as well. It's similar to David's. Here's how it works in code. I created the superview and all it's subviews, even the ones that may not always be showing. I added many of the constraints such as V:|-[_btn] to the superview. As you can see at the end of those constraints there is no link to the bottom on the superview. I then created two arrays of constraints for both states of the view, for me the difference is a 'More Options' disclosure triangle. Then when the triangle is clicked depending on it's state I add and remove constraints and subviews accordingly. For example to add I do:

[self.backgroundView removeConstraints:self.lessOptionsConstraints];
[self.backgroundView addSubview:self.nameField];
[self.backgroundView addConstraints:self.moreOptionsConstraints];

The constraints I removed tied the button to the bottom of the superview like V:[_btn]-|. The constraints I added look like V:[_btn]-[_nameField]-| as you can see this constraint places the new view in between the original view above it and the bottom of the superview which extends the superview's height.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.