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I'm having trouble grasping constructors and specifically how you can dynamically allocate an array within one. Could someone possibly give an example of a class that has an array of floating-point numbers and the constructors accepts an integer arg and dynamically allocates an array to hold that many numbers.

And how other member functions would go about access that array.

Thanks for the assistance and any other helpful insights are much appreciated.

EDIT: I have not learned std:vector yet, is there an even simpler way?

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2  
Writing your own resource management code is never simpler than using the standard library. –  ildjarn Oct 27 '11 at 21:49
3  
The vactor is the simpler way. Doing without a vector is harder. That's why people keep mentioning it. –  Mooing Duck Oct 27 '11 at 21:49
2  
I fully agree with Mooing Duck: The standard library is part of C++. It's there for a reason. Learn it. Use it. It makes life so much easier. Only go into the gory implementation details once you have developed a solid grasp on the language. –  Kerrek SB Oct 27 '11 at 22:03

3 Answers 3

struct Array_holder
{
    float* arr;

    Array_holder(size_t size):
    arr(new float[size])
    {}

    ~Array_holder()
    { delete[] arr; }

    float get(size_t i) const
    { return arr[i]; }
};

writing this rather simple code I made 2 rude mistakes:

1) I forgot to free memory 2) I haven't implemented copy constructor and assignment operator that according to rule of 3 are required if class have destructor.

This is good example why working with dynamic memory is complicated and dangerous. Compare with following example:

#include <vector>

struct Array_holder
{
    std::vector<float> arr;

    Array_holder(size_t size):
    arr(size)
    {}

    float get(size_t i) const
    { return arr.at(i); }
};

This example is shorter, simpler, more readable, less error-prone and more reliable in usage.

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Shame on the memory leaker! –  Kerrek SB Oct 27 '11 at 21:33
    
OMG! tnx, corrected –  Andy T Oct 27 '11 at 21:35
1  
Without a copy constructor and copy assignment operator, this class will corrupt memory very quickly. –  ildjarn Oct 27 '11 at 21:42
    
agreed, edited the answer –  Andy T Oct 28 '11 at 13:53

This is more or less what std::vector does, though that one is implemented with significantly greater generality in mind, so it's a bit hard for a newcomer to read the source of any library implementation (especially given the usually nightmarish naming conventions used in standard library code).

Here's baby's first dynamic array:

class MyArray
{
  float * buf;
  std::size_t size;

public:
  explicit MyArray(std::size_t s) : buf(new float[s]), size(s) { }
  ~MyArray() { delete[] buf; }

  // Copying and reassigning is tricky! We disallow it for now.
  MyArray(MyArray const &) = delete;
  MyArray & operator=(MyArray const &) = delete;

  std::size_t size() const { return size; }
  float & operator[](std::size_t i) { return buf[i]; }
  float const & operator[](std::size_t i)  const { return buf[i]; }
};

This is exception-safe: the only time an exception could happen is in the initializer list of the constructor, and there is only one such occasion (new). Should an exception happen, nothing will be leaked, since nothing else has been allocated at that point.

Usage:

MyArray a(20);
a[4] = 6.3;

A more advanced version would include a resize() feature; for that, you'll have to allocate and copy (say):

void resize(std::size_t n)
{
  float * tmp = new float[n];
  std::copy(buf, buf + std::min(size, n), tmp); // I assume this doesn't throw

  delete[] buf;

  buf = tmp;
  size = n;
}

Once you understand what the assignment operator is supposed to do, you can use an idea very similar to that of resize() to assign one MyArray to another.

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I have not learned std:vector yet, is there an even simpler way? –  Extinct23 Oct 27 '11 at 21:35
1  
@Extinct23: I think in ten years' time when you're a C++ guru you'll look back and this and laugh at how simple and beautiful vector is :-) (It's really not complicated, just general.) –  Kerrek SB Oct 27 '11 at 21:38
    
I don't think it's responsible to show this code without the necessary copy constructor and copy assignment operator... (Also, return size(); is infinite recursion.) –  ildjarn Oct 27 '11 at 21:39
    
@Extinct23: Sorry, I got the operator wrong, I meant it to be the square-bracket operator. Fixed. –  Kerrek SB Oct 27 '11 at 21:40
3  
I feel like there's a homework question floating in the background of this, I vote leave it out. –  Mooing Duck Oct 27 '11 at 22:03

First, because you're using C++, you should just be using a std::vector.

Second:

class DynamicArray {
    float* array;
public:
    DynamicArray( int size ) { array = new float[ size ]; }
    ~DynamicArray( void ) { delete[] array; }
    float* get( void ) const { return array; }
};
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I have not learned std:vector yet, is there an even simpler way? –  Extinct23 Oct 27 '11 at 21:36
1  
I think std::vector is the simplest way because all of the code is written for you and has already been thoroughly tested. –  LowTechGeek Oct 27 '11 at 21:39
1  
Without a copy constructor and copy assignment operator, this class will corrupt memory very quickly. –  ildjarn Oct 27 '11 at 21:42
1  
@ildjarn Yes, I see that now. Good call. And this is why everybody should just use the standard library -- to avoid such errors. I wonder if I can delete my own answer, as damage control ... –  LowTechGeek Oct 27 '11 at 22:18

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