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Ok, I'm in need of a dir monitor that continually scans a dir for new .txt files added. Opens the .txt file, reads/parses the content and writes data to a mysql table. I'm looking into inotify which seems like it is robust and can accomplish this task, but I don't quiet understand how the command sequence would look to accomplish what I mentioned above.

Here is a potential example (tell me if I'm thinking through this properly):

$fd = inotify_init();
$watch_descriptor = inotify_add_watch($fd, '/some/system/dir/', IN_CREATE);
// Loop forever (never break out of loop since I want to ALWAYS monitor this dir)
while (true) {
    $events = inotify_read($fd);
    //THIS IS WHERE I DON'T KNOW HOW TO OPEN THE NEWLY CREATED FILE
    //PLEASE HELP HERE WITH HOW TO SUCCESSFULLY CREATE THE EVENT ACTIONS
    /*
     1) OPEN FILE
     2) READ/PARSE CONTENTS
     3) CREATE MYSQL INSERT STATEMENT
     4) DELETE FILE
    */

}

One question this brings up is: Will continuing this loop forever consume a ridiculous amount of processor capacity? and: If so, is this truly the method I should use to accomplish my goal?

Any help understanding inotify and the sequence required to accomplish my goal would be very helpful.

Thank you in advance.

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Consider incron: doing all the stuff in PHP may be overkill. –  sanmai Dec 14 '12 at 3:47

2 Answers 2

Use inotify_read($fd) to get information from the generated event.

There's a reasonable example over at php.net: http://www.php.net/manual/en/function.inotify-init.php

As for the while loop, inotify_read() will block until there is an event, so it's not as if it's going to be doing a constant spin.

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By 'generated event' do you mean the event that I tell the inotify_watch instance to perform? For example the event can be a function that reads the file, parses the contents, write the data to mysql, and deletes the file? –  sadmicrowave Oct 28 '11 at 2:31
    
I see you've updated your question, and you're correctly getting the event (by assigning it to $events). I would check what information is being stored in $events by way of var_dump. Write a seperate function (which takes a file name as a parameter) to open, read, create the insert statement, and delete file. Those functions are seperate, and should be in a seperate function. They do not differ from standard file I/O operations in PHP. –  EvilChookie Oct 28 '11 at 3:09
    
Thanks to both EvilChookie and TML for help, please see, and comment on, my answer below. –  sadmicrowave Oct 28 '11 at 3:32
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Alright, so this is what I've got so far (thoughts?):

$dir = '/some/system/dir/';
//create mysql database connection here

$fd = inotify_init();
$watch_descriptor = inotify_add_watch($fd, $dir, IN_CREATE);
while (true) {
    $events = inotify_read($fd);
    $filepath = $dir . $events['name'];
    $contents = file_get_contents( $filepath );
    //parse contents and insert records into mysql table (thats the easy part)
    unlink( $filepath );
}
//close mysql database connection here
inotify_rm_watch($fd, $watch_descriptor);
fclose($fd);

It has also been brought to my attention that inotify will engage in process blocking when an event is not being triggered to free system memory and processor capacity (which addresses my concern about the infinite while loop).

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The only concern I have about this stems from not quiet understanding how the inotify listener instance works. If $events finds a create event and begins executing the remaining functions and another file gets created during that time, will the next iteration of $events see this newly created file? Basically, are the created files put in a queue? or does $events have to be 'watching' for the file in order to see it? –  sadmicrowave Nov 1 '11 at 12:24
    
And for that matter - does the event get removed from the queue once it is used by $event? If not, how do I not use the same event again? –  sadmicrowave Nov 2 '11 at 18:16

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