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In superclass in Python, how can I call the function that's overridden in its subclass?

class A:
    @staticmethod
    def interfaceBasedMethod():
        print "Want to delegate to overriding method in subclass"

    @staticmethod
    def a():
        interfaceBasedMethod() # <-- I know this causes error. But here 
                               # I want to call the overridden method in subclass.

class B(A):
    @staticmethod
    def interfaceBasedMethod():
        print "Class B processes."

if __name__ == "__main__":
    b=B
    b.a()

Ideal output:

Class B processes.

Google search doesn't really return pages about Interface-Based Programming in Python, although it should be common in Java etc. Thanks!

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2  
This is polymorphism, not interfaces. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Oct 28 '11 at 2:03
1  
Why are you using @staticmethod if you're trying to do polymorphism? –  Greg Hewgill Oct 28 '11 at 2:09
    
@Brendan Long thanks. I updated the code and hope it looks better. I'm Java programmer and still new to python. –  IsaacS Oct 28 '11 at 2:10
8  
Read this. Now. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Oct 28 '11 at 2:10
1  
@pst: This is not an interface problem though. The method is already defined; the interface won't help. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Oct 28 '11 at 2:56
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Putting aside questions of style, use classmethod not staticmethod. It passes in the class which is being used.

class A:
    @classmethod
    def interfaceBasedMethod(cls):
        print "Want to delegate to overriding method in subclass"

    @classmethod
    def a(cls):
        cls.interfaceBasedMethod()

class B(A):
    @classmethod
    def interfaceBasedMethod(cls):
        print "Class B processes."

if __name__ == "__main__":
    b=B
    b.a()
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Your inheritance question was answered before here.

But in summary, Python provides a function super(type[, instance]).

Documented here, super provides a fairly clean way for accessing superclass methods from within a subclass. This page provides an exhaustive study of super() use cases, but this is the run-down.

class C(B):
    def method(self, arg):
        super(C, self).method(arg)

Which could be generalized a bit....

class C(B):
    def method(self, arg):
        super(self.__class__, self).method(arg)
share|improve this answer
    
This question is about polymorphism, not strictly inheritance. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Oct 28 '11 at 2:25
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