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Is it ok to use syntax like this:

Object.parent.property

or should I restrict it to one dot and one level only?

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2  
look up 'law of demeter': en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Law_of_Demeter –  Mitch Wheat Oct 28 '11 at 2:27
    
The wikipedia page was very helpful! Thanks. –  user1017624 Oct 28 '11 at 2:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In general, it is okay to use:

a.b.c

However, if there are structures involved then it might not work. Consider the following class declaration:

@interface Circle : NSObject
@property (assign) NSPoint centre;
@end

In this case, the centre property is of type NSPoint, a structure (not a class!) that declares two members, x and y. Reading the x coordinate works:

CGFloat x = circle.centre.x;

and is equivalent to:

CGFloat x = [circle center].x;

but writing the x coordinate doesn’t:

circle.centre.x = 50;

because the left part of the assignment, called an lvalue, is not assignable. The assignment is trying to change a member variable of a return value, namely the structure returned by [circle centre].

You’ll have to to write this instead:

NSPoint centre = circle.centre;
centre.x = 50;
circle.centre = centre;
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Yes, it is perfectly fine and common to use syntax like that.

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Yes it is ok, it does not matter how many levels. They all get translated to this.

[[[[Object parent] property] anotherProperty] yetAnotherProperty]

Which is equivalent to this:

Object.parent.property.anotherProperty.yetAnotherProperty;

This explains it all: http://developer.apple.com/library/ios/documentation/cocoa/conceptual/objectivec/Chapters/ocObjectsClasses.html#//apple_ref/doc/uid/TP30001163-CH11-SW17

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