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Here is my implementation of count:

int count(node *start)
{
    static int l ;
    node *current;            /* Node for travelling the linked list*/
    current=start;
    if(current->next!=start)
    {
        l = 1 + count ( current->next ) ;
        return ( l ) ;
    }


    else
    {
        return(1);
    }
}

Here is a fragment of main function where I am calling it:

void main()
{
    node *head;
printf ( "Length of linked list = %d", count ( head ) ) ;
}

Here is the structure:

struct cirdoublelinklist
{
    struct cirdoublelinklist *prev;  /** Stores address of previous node **/
    int value;                   /** stores value **/
    struct cirdoublelinklist *next;  /** stores address of next node **/
};

/** Redefining list as node **/
  typedef struct cirdoublelinklist node;

On running and trying to see the length of a list, it crashes with out of bound memory. Please help me with this, I have been working on this for a long time now.

Method to add the first node:

void initialize(node *start)
{
    start->prev=start;
    printf("\nEnter Value\n");
    scanf("%d",&start->value);
    start->next=start;
}

Method to add subsequent nodes after the location specified:

void insert_after(node *start)
{
    int num;                  /* value for inserting a node */
    int flag=0;
    node *newnode;            /* New inputed node*/
    node *current;            /* Node for travelling the linked list*/
    newnode=(node*)malloc(sizeof(node));
    printf("\nEnter the value after which you want to insert a node\n");
    scanf("%d",&num);
    init(newnode);
    current=start;
    while(current->next!=start)
    {

        if(current->value==num)
        {
            newnode->next=current->next;
            current->next->prev=newnode;
            current->next=newnode;
            newnode->prev=current;
            flag=1;
        }
        current=current->next;
    }
    if(flag==0 && current->next==start && current->value==num)
    {
        /***  Insertion checking for last node  ***/
        newnode->next=current->next;     /* Start is being copied */
        current->next->prev=newnode;
        current->next=newnode;
        newnode->prev=current;
        flag=1;
    }
    if(flag==0 && current->next==NULL)
        printf("\nNo match found\n");
} 
share|improve this question
    
Why did you make l static? That just prevents the function from being fully reentrant, which is usually a requirement for proper recursion. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Oct 28 '11 at 2:45

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Every time you call count, it has a new start, so current->next!=start is always comparing a node to its successor, which will only ever end if the list has length 1. What you most likely want to do is have two functions:

int count(node *start)
{
    if(start == NULL)
        return 0;
    return count_helper(start, start);
}

int count_helper(node *start, node *current)
{
    static int l;
    if(current->next!=start)
    {
        l = 1 + count (start, current->next);
        return ( l ) ;
    }
    else
    {
        return(1);
    }
}

As others have mentioned, the static variable is not necessary. A better way of writing what I have called count_helper would be:

int count_helper(node *start, node *current)
{
    if(current->next!=start)
    {
        return 1 + count (start, current->next);
    }
    else
    {
        return 1;
    }
}

Finally, a more efficient implementation would be non-recursive:

int count(node *start)
{
    if(start == NULL)
        return 0;
    node *current = start->next;
    int c = 1;
    while(current != start)
    {
        c++;
        current = current->next;
    }
    return c;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much Aaron, that was really helpful. Now I have my concepts cleared –  user1017072 Oct 28 '11 at 13:46
    
@user1017072 Please note the edit to the non-recursive version to catch the length = 0 case. Also, it would be helpful if you accepted the answer which you think best answers your question. –  Aaron Dufour Oct 28 '11 at 15:15
    
@Aaron-dufour I think the non-recursive version is wrong. Before the while loop current and start are equal so it's not going to get into the loop, it should be a do-while loop. –  carlosvega Nov 7 '13 at 15:51
1  
@CVega Good catch. I don't remember this answer (2 years old!) but based on my initialization of c to 1, I believe my intent was for current to start at start->next. Does that make sense? –  Aaron Dufour Nov 7 '13 at 16:16
    
Yes, now it's fixed ;) –  carlosvega Nov 7 '13 at 18:31

Well, the problem is that you call the function in the main on a NULL pointer. Infact node *head; is declared but never assigned to something. So when you execute this line:

if(current->next!=start)

the program crashes because it will check for NULL->next that, obviously, doesn't exist.

share|improve this answer
    
I also have a method which basically inserts data values in to the node. But it seems to fail even after the I have created new nodes. For the first node, it gives the right length of 1 (i.e. it goes to the else block), but for the second one, it crashes when it reaches the if(current->next!=start), am I supposed to do some initialization in the function where I am creating nodes? Thank you for your help –  user1017072 Oct 28 '11 at 3:17
    
@user1017072 Well, in this case you should show us the function that add the data. Besides, delete the line static int l; since it's useless and change the if in just return 1 + count ( current->next ) ; which is a proper way to have recursive function. –  Aurelio De Rosa Oct 28 '11 at 3:24
    
Hi, I have edited the question with methods to insert initial node and then subsequent nodes. I tried with removing the static as specified by you, but it still fails with the same out of memory bounds issue. Any more suggestions? Thank you for your time and support –  user1017072 Oct 28 '11 at 3:32

You need to pass a pointer to start pointer in insert_after function

void insert_after(node **start)

instead of

void insert_after(node *start)

Otherwise you'll be just updating the local copy of *start.

Similarly for initialize

void initialize(node **start)
share|improve this answer

Put simply, the recursive calls don't know the original start node. You will need to add a second node* argument and pass the start node via it.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Ignacio, where should I add the second node and how do I pass the start node. I am sorry for sounding like a noob, but could you show me how to correct it, I am not able to understand. Thank you very much for your help –  user1017072 Oct 28 '11 at 3:14
    
In the function prototype. In the function call. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Oct 28 '11 at 3:14

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