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So this is the code I have right now. OPEN is the C++ STL list. States have a 3x3 int array and a parent pointer and a string object that tells how it got their from the previous one. My problem is that after these two lines are executed. Current's parent pointer points to the same state as OPEN.front() except now BOTH OPEN.front() and current's parent's parent points to itself. Its hard to explain but current.parent.parent.parent.parent... = current.parent and the same with OPEN.front().

state current = state(state::goalState);
current.setEqualTo(OPEN.front());


void state::setEqualTo(const state x){
    this->parent = x.parent;
        for (int i = 0; i < 3; ++i) {
            for (int j = 0; j < 3; ++j) {
                this->board[i][j] = x.board[i][j];
            }
        }
    this->howWeGotHere = x.howWeGotHere;
}

I think it has something to do with OPEN.front() returning a reference but I can't figure it out. Any help is much appreciated.

EDIT** Okay here's some code that you can work with

list<state> OPEN;
state current = state(state::goalState);
current.setEqualTo(OPEN.front());
list<state> children = current.generateChildren();
OPEN.splice(OPEN.end(), children);

//State Class
state *parent = NULL;
string howWeGotHere = "";
int board[3][3];

state::state(int x[3][3], state *parent) {
    this->parent = parent;
    for (int i = 0; i < 3; ++i) {
            for (int j = 0; j < 3; ++j) {
                this->board[i][j] = x[i][j];
            }
    }
}

state state::moveLeft() {
int iIndex;
int jIndex;
for (int i = 0; i < 3; ++i) {
    for (int j = 0; j < 3; ++j) {
        if (board[i][j] == 0) {
            iIndex = i;
            jIndex=j;
        }
    }
}
state z = state(board, this);
if (2 == jIndex) {
    return *this;
} else {
    z.board[iIndex][jIndex] = z.board[iIndex][jIndex+1];
    z.board[iIndex][jIndex+1] = 0;
    z.howWeGotHere = "LEFT";
}
return z;
}

state state::moveRight() {
int iIndex;
int jIndex;
for (int i = 0; i < 3; ++i) {
    for (int j = 0; j < 3; ++j) {
        if (board[i][j] == 0) {
            iIndex = i;
            jIndex=j;
        }
    }
}
state z = state(board, this);
if (0 == jIndex) {
    return *this;
} else {
    z.board[iIndex][jIndex] = z.board[iIndex][jIndex-1];
    z.board[iIndex][jIndex-1] = 0;
    z.howWeGotHere = "RIGHT";
}
return z;
}

state state::moveDown() {
int iIndex;
int jIndex;
for (int i = 0; i < 3; ++i) {
    for (int j = 0; j < 3; ++j) {
        if (board[i][j] == 0) {
            iIndex = i;
            jIndex=j;
        }
    }
}
state z = state(board, this);
if (0 == iIndex) {
    return *this;
} else {
    z.board[iIndex][jIndex] = z.board[iIndex-1][jIndex];
    z.board[iIndex-1][jIndex] = 0;
    z.howWeGotHere = "DOWN";
}
return z;
}

state state::moveUp() {
int iIndex;
int jIndex;
for (int i = 0; i < 3; ++i) {
    for (int j = 0; j < 3; ++j) {
        if (board[i][j] == 0) {
            iIndex = i;
            jIndex = j;
        }
    }
}
state z = state(board, this);
if (2 == iIndex) {
    return *this;
} else {
    z.board[iIndex][jIndex] = z.board[iIndex+1][jIndex];
    z.board[iIndex+1][jIndex] = 0;
    z.howWeGotHere = "UP";

}
return z;
}

void state::setEqualTo(const state x){
this->parent = x.parent;
for (int i = 0; i < 3; ++i) {
    for (int j = 0; j < 3; ++j) {
        this->board[i][j] = x.board[i][j];
    }
}
this->howWeGotHere = x.howWeGotHere;
}

list<state> state::generateChildren(){
list<state> children;
state temp(board);
temp.setEqualTo(this->moveUp());
if(*this == temp) {
} else {
    children.push_front(temp);
}
temp.setEqualTo(this->moveDown());
if(*this == temp) {
} else {
    children.push_front(temp);
}
temp.setEqualTo(this->moveLeft());
if(*this == temp) {
} else {
    children.push_front(temp);
}
temp.setEqualTo(this->moveRight());
if(*this == temp) {
} else {
    children.push_front(temp);
}
return children;
} 
share|improve this question
    
Is the expression OPEN.front().parent == OPEN.front() true before the code block here? If it is, that's why after the setEqualTo call, current.parent == current. –  Borealid Oct 28 '11 at 2:57
    
Give us some code that we can compile and run that shows your problem. Your English description is only paritaly usefull and it is hard to tell how accurate your English description is. Code is absolute and we can give you real advice based on code. –  Loki Astari Oct 28 '11 at 2:58
    
And No, OPEN.front().parent == &OPEN.front() returns false. :( –  woolcock66 Oct 28 '11 at 3:14
    
How did this code get so big without working? Never add to code that doesn't work. (Also it doesn't compile without editing.) –  Beta Oct 28 '11 at 3:24
2  
The operative word is: compilable. 28 compile time errors is not much use. But the act of reducing the code to the smallest compilable example that illustrates the problem usually shows the problem and as such is a good exercise. –  Loki Astari Oct 28 '11 at 6:05
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